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  1. Raul - like you I'm comparing numbers between countries. Earlier in the year I was in Australia with a client so I'm watching Australia and Canada, as well as the UK and USA. Australia and Canada had similar numbers for a while but Canada's have grown much faster. Our measures here were less strict and slower. The UK and USA - both very slow and very lax. The US doesn't even have a single health care system to speak of so they are really in rough shape. I think Boris in the UK got a lesson on "herd immunity" and fortunately for him, survived. Given the timing of the crisis, a lot of retired Ca
    3 points
  2. I wanted to let you of some upcoming changes to the Road to Reliability Community site. First of all, I am very excited to announce that work has commenced on a Road to Reliability app that will become available in Q2 2021. This will make all courses offered through the Road to Reliability Academy available to you on the go via a native iOS and Android app. More to follow on this in Q1 2020. In preparation for this, the free online community will merge with the Road to Reliability Academy site later this year or very early in 2021. This is so that we can offer the community thro
    2 points
  3. I've used SAP, JD Edwards, MP2 and MP2 with a custom GUI on top of it. Both SAP and JDE are a struggle. Both REQUIRE power users, lots of upfront and continuous training, integration support, etc. If you don't have lots of money to throw at it to set it up in the beginning, don't even try. Also, without a financial commitment to go mobile, you are likely stuck with salaried folks or power users writing and processing all work orders. If your industry processes a lot of short repairs, you can quickly get overwhelmed with the volume if you don't have enough people assets to writ
    2 points
  4. With my five (5) years experience, i have only worked with SAP. Its the best and i highly recommend it. Its just unfortunate that i have not had an opportunity to work on other CMMS for comparison.
    2 points
  5. Just wanted to share a brand new video presentation that I just released: Increase Your Workforce by 33% Without Hiring Anyone How Maintenance Planning & Scheduling allows you get get more work done with less people, reduce costs and improve morale.
    2 points
  6. I had been using SAP for 18 years in the power industry and it is a very powerful tool, but since changing jobs am now using Microsoft Dynamics AX. This is also a powerful tool but not so user friendly as SAP.
    2 points
  7. Well described Raul. The failure mode must have a time or usage based distribution. In Weibull analysis it has a beta value greater than 1. The larger the value, the more strongly related to aging the failure is. As in all proactive work we are aiming to reduce the risks of failure. We do that by reducing what happens when the failure occurs (consequence mitigation) or by reducing the probability it will happen. With age related failures, where preventive measures can be effective, they actually prevent most of the failures if they are performed at an early enough time. I've seen quite a
    2 points
  8. A challenge that must be solved. I have a passion for teaching and solving problems. The former is often required as a part of the latter. Anytime I share some information I feel good. It's gratifying to be recognized for what I do, but more importantly, it's fulfilling to help others.
    2 points
  9. I passed the exam back in 2017 and will renew it again. I did not have any study material; however, I do have extensive experience in maintenance and maintenance practices. You need to be knowledgeable in many areas including CMMS, machine reliability, warehousing, etc.
    2 points
  10. Well my mum wanted me to study Accounting so I can work in Banks and knot tie but after my Junior school, I told her I want to start learning Auto mechanic after class.....was funny at start because my classmate will come around just to make jest of me............it was not a common thing because everyone was focusing on only school. But it became clear after the first 2 years of studying mechanical engineering and I had to do IT with Procter and Gamble, then I develop a kin interest in maintenance and after which I was also employed in the company, worked in both PM and AM as a team memb
    2 points
  11. Hi Erik and all members, Very nice to be member of this community. My name is Félix Mutandi from D.R.Congo and I had spent 6 years in mining industry, working in Maintenance as a maintenance planner.
    1 point
  12. We have been using this tool for years and it has saved the company countless downtime and expenses by catching items before the go catastrophic. The nice thing is that you can detect the issue in the early stage and plan the repairs instead of running to failure and being forced to shut equipment down at a less than desirable time. Myself and some colleagues have all been through the training at Technical associates of Charlotte and are ISO certified category 2. We have routes on all the equipment deemed critical and take vibration readings on a regular basis that way we can trend the equipme
    1 point
  13. @Erik Hupje do you have more info, or examples of, on using RPN as I agree with your comment in regards to the benefits of it's use. I am currently employed as a Contractor Site Manager offering contract tradespersons to our client and they are stuck in a very reactive culture, yet won't admit it. I would be very interested in seeing an example of a RPN to learn more about the scoring. I am aligned with your thinking and logic in your "Road to Reliability" documents and want to use more to try and develop a more proactive culture at the site. It is often very difficult to get owners to listen
    1 point
  14. I have used edX previously for some AWS courses that were very good. While not free I have used the website udemy to develop a number of skills releating to PLC programming, C++ programming and even excel forms sheets. Udemy is definitly worth checking out.
    1 point
  15. Hy everyone, In the last years I have been working in several kind of businesses. In the position of setting up technical departments at different kind of factory's. Each with their own ERP and all kind of CMMS-systems. Ultimo, Maximo, Sap, AX..." How many more do i have to mention. " For myself at a medium size company is TDO-office working : Understandable for technical skilled people > Low cost > high output > No yearly fee. etc. etc. It al depend on the size and business of the company itself... depending on management decisions with " their view of how
    1 point
  16. Good morning! I have used a few different CMMS packages as indicated by others on this thread. In addition, I was fortunate enough to be on two CMMS design & development projects teams. In short, there are several CMMS packages to choose from and, of course, each claims to be better than the other. As Darrell had stated in the response above, latest code and ease of use is very important. In general, all CMMS systems are designed to do the following 1. Create work orders and capture work order history. 2. Allow for PM inspections to be scheduled and generated (crea
    1 point
  17. Short update. Work centers are complete and the cost centers have been assigned by the site accountant. I gave a short presentation to the team introducing SAP, what a work centre is, functional location and the reason for the equipment lists. This was as much for me to be 100% clear and be able to give a good explanation. I created a CAD drawing of the site showing the work centers that I will plot out A1 for the techs and the planner. Same with the functional locations to follow. This will greatly assist the technicians if they are creating work orders for break
    1 point
  18. Hi Jim and Raul, just wanted to add an additional piece of information about the KPIs; the updated GMARI (Global Maintenance and Reliability Indicators) workbook on harmonized indicators has just been released jointly by SMRP and EFNMS. It describes the similarities and differences between SMRP metrics and the EN 14341 which I have mentioned in some of my posts. It is available for purchase on both organizations' web sites and might be a valuable input for an effort Jim and many others are facing with. Best regards, Andrej
    1 point
  19. Hi @Hadwll, I think that is fine. Also try to create detalied descriptions for those funtional locations. For instance: CF34-2P-CP-002 - Raw water pump from tank A to tank B This is really handy when doing failure analysis and understanding the process of your plant. Regards, Raul Martins
    1 point
  20. Hi Andre & Raul, Good day and thank you for bring light to this topic. Andre, I like your list of KPIs as it is a starting point for companies to embrace and record their journey through growth. Raul and I had spent a few months discussing the importance of this topic, especially with regards to the types of KPIs and implementation strategies thereof. When I started working for the company I am presently with over 2 years ago, there were no KPIs at all because the company was not utilizing anything above 5% to 10% utilization of its CMMS System. Immediately this should
    1 point
  21. Hadwll, Good morning and thanks for sharing your journey! I am very interested in reviewing your progress and results. Have a great day! Jim
    1 point
  22. Hi @Raul Martins there were some discussions on KPIs already in one of the Preventive Maintenance discussions in January and this is indeed a very important topic. KPIs cover broad aspects of maintenance management and they can be categorized as: · economic, · technical and · organisational. This is also the approach of the international standard EN 15341 Maintenance - Maintenance Key Performance Indicators, which I refer to very often. It proposes a huge number of KPIs, so it is absolutely necessary to selective and specific for the purpose.
    1 point
  23. Hi @Jim Vantyghem, I absolutely agree with your thoughts and that's why I mentioned the PCT in my response on May 12. The Prosci's Project Change Triangle (PCT) is about the three necessary constituents of any change project - Sponsorship/Leadership, Project Management and Change Management. While PM is mostly about technical aspect of the project, CM is all about people as human beings and their needs which have to be met should we want the change to succeed. And the reason Prosci has introduced so called ADKAR (Awareness, Desire, Knowledge, Ability, Reinforcement) elements, is exa
    1 point
  24. The connection could be either with engineers from the maintenance team or with OEM (if there is a technical support contract )
    1 point
  25. I would definitely agree with Erik that this is a topic worthy of more discussion. In the early 90s, as a maintenance manager, I had noticed the trend of so called repairs being associated to equipment setup or human errors. In this particular facility, it was the responsibility for the operators to setup equipment. The maintenance staff had been frustrated by this situations and thus, we set in place the following plan. 1. Using the functionality of the PM work order generation application, we had created blanket work orders with a change to the WO type code so as to read SETUP inst
    1 point
  26. Hi all, Today we will be creating a slightly different topic than what we are used to. The world is going through an unprecedented situation, called COVID-19. Road to Reliability online community has members from many different countries and, although each country is currently facing a different situation, infection rates and putting different preventive measures in place, nearly everyone has been affected somehow. The idea of this topic is to have an open discussion about this situation. Feel free to share how you are going through it, what is the situation of your country
    1 point
  27. Gentlemen, I believe that change management has more elements to it than just obtaining sponsorship from the executive level. Remember that we are dealing with human beings! How we think, how we form beliefs, how we confirm those beliefs, the syntax or strategies formed to be in alignment with these beliefs, whether these beliefs are limiting or empowering. our value systems and alignment with our beliefs and strategies, how we chose to use Fear and Pleasure to guide us. Uptime Jim, You and I had a conversation on this topic in brief and we both concluded that a lot o
    1 point
  28. Hello everyone Firstly is doing Root Cause analysis to understand the the causes of assembly causes. From the RCA I will then get a better understanding the issues and pin pointing underlining issues. Training and coaching of of our employees on precision maintenance that would assist improving our maintenance. Also developing work instructions to the maintenance teams on assembly issues.
    1 point
  29. Hi UptimeJIm and all; could not agree more with your statement. Have seen quite a few cases like that - and the worst of it all was that the top management was not even aware of the need for sponsorship. And let me cite just two important conclusions from Prosci's studies over the last 20 years worldwide having involved more than 3400 participants: Projects with excellent CM are 6x more likely to meet or exceed their objectives. The executive sponsor has the highest single impact on project success. Best regards, Andrej
    1 point
  30. Greetings Raul, I'd go so far as to say they won't just struggle, they will fail without that sponsorship. Some changes, usually minor ones, are within a single manager's control. In Maintenance you might control some training budget, and how your own crews interact. For instance, you can get problems identified using Condition Monitoring to be dealt with in a timely manner by planners and field supervisors so the benefits of Condition Monitoring are realized. That's something I've noticed does not always happen, and it is within your control. But something that will cross departmental bo
    1 point
  31. Raul , my best greeting and congratulations for this page where we can dialoge about our specialty and learn a litter more Please continue going on this and include others themes like RFA Root Failure Analysis, Non Destructive Tests to apply in the industry and so on. Thank you Seidel Muriel seidelmuriel@hotmail.com
    1 point
  32. Hi Raul my best greetings. In your written does not mention the Predictive Maintenance, I would like to know your thoughts. Thank you . Seidel Muriel , Cali Colombia , e-mail. seidelmuriel@hotmail.com
    1 point
  33. Hi all, My biggist problem at the moment is i can plan work but have problems with the permit office releasing plant for us to do the work. Have any of you others had this problem and how have you managed to solve it.
    1 point
  34. Great article.BoM management is really important. From my experience we also introduced a bottom up method on daily morning Lean Meetings where we get real time information which spares needs to be replenished to ensure our BoM has necessary spares.It's proving to be effective together with the CMMS.
    1 point
  35. Although I live in Australia, I am originally from Brazil. So I have closely watched the situation in both countries. Australian has put strict measures in place, closing non-essential businesses for nearly three weeks now. On top of that, Australia has one of the highest test rates in the world. As a result, the curve has started to flatten. On the other hand, Brazil has done something similar to some European countries and the USA, and the test rates are quite low (although it has started to change), hence the number of cases are still getting higher and higher. When it comes
    1 point
  36. Here in Canada we have shutdown non-essential businesses, closed borders and restricted internal travel. Big gathering spots (malls, sport events) are closed. People are being asked to "stay home" and most businesses have sent people home. Social distancing is being practiced when going out (e.g.: shopping for groceries, walking for exercise, etc.). When I get out for walking the dogs or my own exercise I am seeing a lot more people gardening, walking, riding bicycles and all keeping distance. I notice more people now than when things are "normal". Our biggest growth in our cases is from
    1 point
  37. Hi @Chuck Clarkson and @Mohammed tawili, I agree with you about the limitations of the 5Whys. Yet, I see it as a good solution in two different scenarios: 1- You have no defect elimination process and need to start understanding and eliminating failures; 2- You have a well-implemented defect elimination process with different triggers. For instance, it can be used in minor failures (up to 1 hour downtime?) analyses by properly trained staff members, such as Maintenance Technicians and Operators. While for major failures, another technique can be used by Engineers. By doing
    1 point
  38. @Raul Martinsthanks indeed!
    1 point
  39. As Maintenance and Reliability professionals, we all have seen many different failure events happening over the years. Although we do not want them, they are there to say hello to us. Even when we try to avoid their occurrence by using proactive Reliability techniques, like FMEA or RCM, some failures will still happen, and that is totally fine. Having to deal with one problem is fine, but there is something that always annoys every one: dealing with the same problems over and over again. Right? Due to this fact, we have an important stage in the Road to Reliability, which is na
    1 point
  40. Greetings Raul, Senior management (i.e.: those with true P&L responsibility and strategic decision making authority) need to be made aware of the business impact of NOT acting and the costs associated with taking action. If there is truly a valid business case (and there often is), and the costs do not exceed their ability to pay (the company must have money or be able to find money to pay for it), then they will want to take action. Their next questions will be about "how to" do it. This where it pays to have some outside help. Internal resources are often inexperienced at mana
    1 point
  41. Hi all, In the Road to Reliability Roadmap™, we discuss four essential elements to reach a reliable plant, which one of those processes is Maintenance Planning and Scheduling (P&S). We all know that Planning and Scheduling plays a vital role in achieving an efficient Maintenance, by ensuring all the necessary resources will be available at the right moment. However, many companies still struggle to implement a proper P&S process. The reasons for this vary, but lack of knowledge is definitely one of those, as it still quite common to find Maintenance professionals that do
    1 point
  42. I do really the like the subject and especially the emphasis on P&S with two simple analogies. I found people during the quality assurance program we established do not follow the “weekly schedule” ...... after conducting simple RCA I tend to agree lack of knowledge
    1 point
  43. Derek, do you see failures as a result of not getting your PMs done? If not they are probably not that effective anyway. always present the consequences and slope the decision to not do PMs to management. This can easily change their decision. Good luck.
    1 point
  44. We have a winner!!! We are pleased to announce that the entry #276 have won our giveaway campaign! Congratulations to our community member @Cornelius Mpesi!!! You have just won your personal copy of "Maintenance and Reliability Best Practices" by Ramesh Gulati! We will arrange the shipping and you will receive your personal copy of this best seller pretty soon! Thanks to everyone who participated of the campaign and to all of those who have helped us to build our Road to Reliability! See you all soon!
    1 point
  45. Thanks for sharing your stories @Raul Martins, @Cornelius Mpesi and @Bukola. Looking forward to reading more of these! In the mean time here's how I ended up in maintenance & reliability, like most my path was not really a deliberate choice, but more the result of taking an opportunity that presented itself. I joined Shell in the Netherlands back in 1997 having completed a general degree combining engineering and management. Within a few months I was asked to start a development path towards an Instrument Engineer, which was interesting at first, but I did not want to become a t
    1 point
  46. I have not taken the CMRP exam and have thought about it a number of times, but have never taken the leap. I have a MMP (Maintenance Management Professional) Certification in Canada, but the CMRP seems to be more widely recognized.
    1 point
  47. Hi @Oniastm7, Great reply! Recognition is really important to keep anyone motivated, and I think it works side by side with a solid feedback. When we achieve a solid result, receiving a positive feedback followed by a recognition, that can be written, or verbal for example keeps us on track of doing similar actions to achieve more positive results. On the other hand, when we do a task that does not achieve the expectations, receiving a solid feedback is important not only to let us aware of what has gone wrong, but also to make us think about our mistakes and improve our attitude.
    1 point
  48. My first CMMS was a home grown system called, "Dynamic Equipment Information Systems" (DEIS) at the PetroChemical complex where I worked as a maintenance engineer. It was a very basic work order system that provided job plan details, parts lists and history. Each job was recorded in text fields and all the history was printed with any work order. The thickness of the work order print out was an indicator of troublesome equipment, or a long BOM. Our refinery (next door) was using a paper based system. Both worked well for work management and since discipline of recording what was found wrong an
    1 point
  49. Dear All I have used few CMMS tools. In the end, my feelings are that like any other tool, best CMMS depends on user. I have following reasons to justify my answer: I have seen very good report through Macro based Excel files & very bad reports through MAXIMO or EMS I have seen most of the tools fields empty for many reasons which basically doesn't give you information I have seen wrong entries giving you wrong information. They are made so heavy that people are not able to enter everything. Generally CMMS is chosen based on many reasons sometimes out
    1 point
  50. Hi Erik, I have passed it in 2015. My membership have lapsed now and I didn't renew it as it is not widely recognized here in Malaysia, and the courses to get the points are not as easy to get locally. If memory serves me right, the exam itself was not extremely difficult, as it was just a couple of hours worth of exam to regurgitate what you have (or should have) listened to after a 3 day presentation/course. I guess the trickiest ones are the definitions Have you attended the CMRP?
    1 point
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