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Erik Hupje

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Erik Hupje last won the day on January 15

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About Erik Hupje

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  1. Erik Hupje

    Derek Brown, Scotland UK

    Hi @Derek Brown I did indeed sit the CMRP. To prepare I refreshed a couple of subjects by re-reading parts of books I already had and read through the SMRP Body of Knowledge documentation. I would recommend reading the following books that are on the SMRP list of recommended books: Maintenance Planning & Scheduling Handbook by Doc Palmer The Toyota Way by Jeffery Liker Maintenance & Reliability Best Practices by Ramesh Gulatti Making Common Sense Common Practice by Ron Moore Reliability-Centered Maintenance by John Moubray You can buy these second hand via amazon.com, abebooks.com or bookdepository.com which has free global shipping. Just hunt around and you can pick up a good second-hand copy for not too much money. Don't think you would need to read more than these. I would not recommend buying the SMRP Guide to the Maintenance and Reliability Body of Knowledge. It will set you back $50.00 or $25.00 if you’re already an SMRP member. But the guide is just 20 pages long and given the lack of detail and depth, I believe it should be something the SMRP offers for free. Better use your money to buy one of the above books. I did not do any specific course to prepare. The exam is supposed to be an experience based exam rather than a knowledge-based exam that you can really study for. I did the computer-based exam which you can do in almost any country in the world. You can find the test centers on this page https://smrp.org/CMRP-Registration by clicking the "locate a testing center"
  2. Erik Hupje

    Introductions

    Welcome to the community @ISRAEL PEREZ - you have clearly had a busy 6 months with finishing off your MBA and getting married. Congratulations! Where in Spain are you working?
  3. Hi @Syed Ibad Arif I expect to have a beta launch to about 10-15 students in March to do a final test of the learning management system and iron out any last issues or inconsistencies (beta students will get a discount in return and lifetime access to the course including all future updates). The course will then go public probably late April.
  4. In an effort to further help our community I would like to compile a list of what YOU are looking for most often. I can then set out to create a list of articles or resource pages to help fill this gap. So, please let me know your thoughts: What information do you need? What do you want to learn more about? Do you need technical information? Information on technical standards? Would you like to see examples of equipment maintenance strategies e.g. for pumps, motors etc? More basic articles that explain concepts like RCM, RBI, corrosion management, process safety? Or maybe more technical hands-on information on alignment, flange management? Would you prefer articles or video presentations?
  5. Erik Hupje

    Introductions

    Welcome @Jomel Kawi and @David Zhang great to have you both join us.
  6. Erik Hupje

    Derek Brown, Scotland UK

    Not that I am aware of, but I could be wrong. Another option is the Asset Reliability Practitioner accreditation delivered by the Mobius Institute: https://www.mobiusinstitute.com/site2/landing.asp?LinkID=116
  7. Erik Hupje

    Derek Brown, Scotland UK

    That's a great personal development path @Derek Brown I always recommend the CMRP certification which is run by the Society of Maintenance & Reliability professionals, mainly because it is the most widely recognised certification. Have a look here: https://smrp.org/Certification/CMRP-Certification To get certified as a CMRP you need to successfully pass the exam. And the exam is supposed to be based on your experience rather than just a knowledge based exam that you can study for. That said, I would suggest you start by reading the following books that are on the SMRP list of recommended books: Maintenance Planning & Scheduling Handbook by Doc Palmer The Toyota Way by Jeffery Liker Maintenance & Reliability Best Practices by Ramesh Gulatti Making Common Sense Common Practice by Ron Moore Reliability-Centered Maintenance by John Moubray You can buy these second hand via amazon.com, abebooks.com or bookdepository.com which has free global shipping. Just hunt around and you can pick up a good second hand copy for not too much money. I would not recommend buying the SMRP Guide to the Maintenance and Reliability Body of Knowledge. It will set you back $50.00 or $25.00 if you’re already an SMRP member. But the guide is just 20 pages long and given the lack of detail and depth it provides I believe it should be something the SMRP offers for free. Better use your money to buy one of the above books. You can sit the CMRP exam as a computer-based test in almost any country in the world. It is not cheap, but if this is really the career path you wish to pursue it is worth the investment - or better yet, try to get your employer to pay for the exam. You can find the test centers from this page https://smrp.org/CMRP-Registration by clicking the "locate a testing center" Another good certification could be the Certified Reliability Engineer (CRE) by the American Society for Quality but I have not done that one myself. You can find more details here: https://asq.org/cert/reliability-engineer And once you have the CMRP under your belt and a reasonable amount of experience you might want to consider the Certified Reliability Leader (CRL) program.
  8. Hi @Thabang one way you can help to avoid this is to work together with your production, engineering and project departments and maintain a joint, long term schedule of all plant and critical equipment outages. You can then get production to become the owner of that schedule and all functions that require outages have to add their scope into that schedule so that it can be aligned. This is a relatively easy and quick way to really reduce scheduled downtime in many assets!
  9. I can only speak from my own experience in the upstream Oil & Gas and what we tend to do for managing production outages is the following: (1) we maintain a long-term schedule and agree windows within the next 2-5 years during which we can shutdown the full plant to conduct maintenance or engineering works. Those windows are typically dictated by periods of lower customer offtakes (which are often seasonal). One thing this does drive is that all scope from different functions e.g. engineering, projects, maintenance all needs to be executed during the same outage. That is one way of reducing downtime. (2) outages are planned a long time in advance, for a major 10 or 14-day shutdown we would aim to have a dedicated planning team in place 12-18 months in advance and go through a rigorous process to challenge the scopes and durations. A really important step is typically challenging the outage scope and then freezing it very early on so that there is enough time to do detailed planning & scheduling. late scope changes require senior approvals This may not exactly work in your environment, but I have quite successfully applied the same principles to critical equipment outages (rather than full plant outages). And the rigor and discipline that comes with this approach really does reduce downtime (but can be hard to instill in an organisation!)
  10. That really is one of the most classic problems @Frank And unless you can show with numbers that a lack of PM leads to breakdowns and breakdowns result in longer downtimes it can be a very hard sell. Have you found that this differs from manager to manager?
  11. Erik Hupje

    Derek Brown, Scotland UK

    Welcome @Derek Brown there are quite a few Oil & Gas people around here. Are you in the upstream or downstream?
  12. Erik Hupje

    Introductions

    Welcome @Christine to the community, there are plenty of oil & gas people around already. What are the main things you're interested in for your personal development? Maybe post some questions in the different topic groups to get the conversations flowing.
  13. Erik Hupje

    What is the best CMMS?

    Very true @Frank! I also like your point that too many CMMS's out there force technicians to enter trivial data that is never used...
  14. Erik Hupje

    Introductions

    Hi @Lewis eyo, welcome to the community, good to have you with us.
  15. Thanks for sharing @Lewis eyo - how did you overcome this issue?
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