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Erik Hupje

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Erik Hupje last won the day on August 4

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About Erik Hupje

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  1. Welcome back @Phil Kluetz the more people we have and the more topics / discussions are raised the more valuable the community becomes. It is what we make it!
  2. Just wanted to share a brand new video presentation that I just released: Increase Your Workforce by 33% Without Hiring Anyone How Maintenance Planning & Scheduling allows you get get more work done with less people, reduce costs and improve morale.
  3. This has been something I have experienced plenty of times, at different plants and in different parts of the world. In all cases the best approach I found was to really get Operations involved in the development of the Frozen Weekly Schedule and then have them present as part of a short, daily meeting where you review the work that was completed yesterday, is due to be completed today and what is scheduled tomorrow (we called it the YTT Meeting with YTT = Yesterday Today Tomorrow). And then at the end of each week report out what works was completed as per the Weekly Schedule and what did not get completed and what the main factors where e.g. extensive permit delays etc. Just as Raul says make sure you stick to data and facts and avoid issues becoming personal.
  4. Hi @Derek Brown when you install a new piece of equipment a large number of failure modes will indeed be random and not age related. The percentage of random failures depends on the equipment and also the operating conditions for example many corrosion mechanisms are age related (but not all!) which is why for example the submarine data quoted from the SUBMEPP study in 2001 shows a lot more age-related failures (pattern C) versus the original United Airlines (UAL) Study from 1968 (see https://www.roadtoreliability.com/reliability-centered-maintenance-principles/) And it also depends on your maintenance practices - if you install bearings really well, lubricate them exceptionally well and operate them just perfectly you may indeed experience age related bearing failures. Most organisations don't manage to do that and they never get to age related failure modes on bearings instead they experience random failures because a defect is introduced by e.g. poor lubrication practices. What you'd want to do is to determine the dominant failure modes for that new piece of equipment, determine the consequence of failure and whether the impact warrants a maintenance action. Then look at the characteristics of the failure mode and whether it is likely to be random or age related. It it's clearly age (or cycle) related than a time based PM can be very cost effective, if it's likely to be random then indeed you want to look at a condition monitoring task. Bear in mind that a condition monitoring task needs to be practical, cost effective and that the value of knowing that a failure is likely to occur needs to be worth it. If the consequence is really limited a run-to-failure strategy can be perfectly acceptable. You don't need to go through a full RCM you could develop a relatively simple FMEA in a workshop with your engineers, maintenance technicians and machine operators. There is likely to be a wealth of knowledge there. And bear in mind that if you are really installing a like-for-like then you can use your historical failure data to determine your dominant failure modes (and then add to that list during the workshop). Hope that helps?
  5. Sorry to hear that @Jim Vantyghem, hopefully things will start getting back on track in 4 weeks at least to the degree that you can get back to work. take care.
  6. Thanks for your insightful contributions @Raul Martins and @UptimeJim The immediate impact of this pandemic is terrible indeed and I'm afraid we're not out of the woods by a long shot. Many countries are still only at the early stages of this pandemic. As you both mentioned, Australia reacted fairly quick and with strong measures so early indications are that we have indeed flattened the curve - for now. What worries me is what an exit strategy looks like once the curve has been flattened. A vaccine is likely to be 12-18 months away (or more) and how do you re-open a country without a vaccine (or herd immunity)? Huge economic damage has already been done. I'm afraid a lot more is to follow. Job losses have been huge - here in Australia and around the world - I'm worried that a recovery could take many years. But I am also an optimist so we'll have to work through this and for many of us around the world it is important to realise how good we've had it to date. Maybe an opportunity that we come out of this more grateful and more caring for others (and indeed our beautiful planet).
  7. Thanks for sharing @Doug Shortt and @Mike Walker. Indeed it seems that the CMRP is probably the most widely accepted and known maintenance & reliability accreditation. I am keen to support it, and often recommend people to get certified.
  8. Thanks for sharing your stories @Raul Martins, @Cornelius Mpesi and @Bukola. Looking forward to reading more of these! In the mean time here's how I ended up in maintenance & reliability, like most my path was not really a deliberate choice, but more the result of taking an opportunity that presented itself. I joined Shell in the Netherlands back in 1997 having completed a general degree combining engineering and management. Within a few months I was asked to start a development path towards an Instrument Engineer, which was interesting at first, but I did not want to become a technical specialist. After 3 years of working in the UK as a graduate engineer in the instrumentation & control discipline I was offered a broadening role supporting the local management team, which I gladly accepted. Great opportunity and that is how I ended up moving to the Philippines, one of the UK Asset Manager's moved across to the Philippines and several months later asked me to come across too (after i was refused a work visa in Brunei). I initially had a business role in the Philippines and was due to become a project engineer after 2 years, but the project was cancelled. The Asset Manager asked if would be willing to spend some time analysing our maintenance performance as we had some major issues in that area. I thought that maintenance would be a decent choice as it would allow me to work across other industries too... Besides the other choice would have been to leave the Philippines and we had only just been there for 1.5 years. I ended up staying for 7 years in the Philippines, before moving to Oman and later Australia. All the time I was involved in maintenance and reliability improvement of either existing assets or the maintenance build for major projects.
  9. Welcome @Lorna great to have you with us. SAP is a beast that is for sure, hard to tame but very powerful. And welcome to you too @LaWayne Smith There are a few approaches I recommend to breaking that typical reactive cycle and which way you go depends on the state of your plant, but prioritisation of new work requests is key as well as trying to eliminate defects and those repetitive failures. Prioritisation can be a quick win and really give you more breathing space. But getting rid of a defect that has been causing a lot of breakdowns or downtime (i.e. a bad actor) can be a really good way to show to management the value of investing in reliability improvement...
  10. Welcome @GThorpe, great to have you onboard. We'll soon be big enough to have a face-to-face community meet up here in Brisbane!
  11. Welcome @Wirza, @craig and @Andronica Kwapeng. In the case of Wirza and Craig apologies for the sluggish reply, but glad to have you all joined. looking forward to your contributions!
  12. Fantastic topic and post @Jim Vantyghem... I'm going to listen first
  13. For those of you who are interested in joining the online course in Maintenance Planning & Scheduling and who did not pre-register their interest, I am happy to inform you that the Pilot Program for the course is now open! Join the Pilot Program The Pilot Program will offer up to 30 students early access to the course and these select few will get: lifetime access to the course (so access to all future course updates!) increased access to me as during the Pilot Program we will conduct more frequent live 'office hours' to answer questions all course materials like videos, slides, audio and transcripts a 25% discount off the list price and of course, a Certificate of Completion I do ask that students in the Pilot Program provide ongoing feedback during the course. That will help me to iron out any last bugs in the Online Learning Management System and make any tweaks to the course content. I am a big believer in continuous improvement and getting your feedback will increase the quality of the course - for you and for all future students. You have until the 31st January to join, but I would strongly recommend you don’t wait that long as 300+ people have indicated they want to join the Pilot Program. And I only have space for 30 students. Spaces might fill up fast and once we hit the 30 participants the Pilot Program will close. Once the Pilot Program closes, the next opportunity to join the course will be in 2-3 months and without any discount. Join the Pilot Program
  14. Erik Hupje

    Suggestions

    Hi @Ted, thanks for sharing that real life issue. Couple of thoughts - first of all, go visit a couple of stores and see what the real issue is. Why are people not using the CMMS work request feature? What are the barriers? And do the people understand the importance / value it adds for you and your team? Typically I have found that in instances like these it would be good to agree a focal point for each site/store who enters the work requests (or maybe a couple). You then have someone you can train, coach and it should also help communication. As @Jim Vantyghem mentioned these issues are often a lot about how you deal with people and a good viewpoint is to consider "WIIFM" or "What's In It For Me?" What doe the stores personnel get out of using the CMMS work request feature. If you can show them how it makes their life easier, less frustrating etc. then you should be on to a winner. Please let us knowhow you go in a future update. Kind regards, Erik
  15. Sounds to me that what you're describing there @Raul Martins is a spares strategy (?) where you conduct a risk based analysis of whether you need to stock something or not. I am not sure a contract will help too much, as @UptimeJim mentioned, vendors will be quite happy to stock spares for you that are fast moving and therefore you could quite easily purchase yourself without a contract. Getting someone to hold long lead items on your behalf is costly and typically not worth the hassle / cost unless you use an aggregator / stockist and take more of a commodity approach i.e. not insist on like for like but are willing to accept functionally the same - that can work well for e.g. valves. For critical spares you probably won't have much choice than to hold them in stock yourself. If you're in industry where production losses are high value then the prudent option would probably be to start off with a relatively high inventory and progressively reduce inventory over time - just be careful that you don't get rid of non-moving inventory that are in fact critical to your operation!
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