Jump to content
Test ×

Erik Hupje

Founder
  • Content Count

    248
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    40

Erik Hupje last won the day on September 11

Erik Hupje had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

100 Excellent

8 Followers

About Erik Hupje

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Personal Information

Recent Profile Visitors

2,496 profile views
  1. Hi @Doug Shortt apologies for the late reply. Also just re-reading I should have use "RIME" instead of RPN which I have no fixed. I've attached a sample of both the RIME and RAM methods which are slides from the online Maintenance Planning & Scheduling course
  2. Thanks for sharing your SAP journey with us @Hadwll When you train your staff make sure you do not just train your staff in SAP transactions, but that you train them in the business process so they understand what they're being asked to do, how to do it and why.
  3. Sorry @Raul Martins and @Herr Schneider missed this topic. I do not have direct experience with what is referred to as Risk Based Work Selection, but I have been actively involved in scope reviews for major turnarounds and these were very much risk based. And very similar to what is described for RBWS in the Becht article in that it was a facilitated review of all turnaround scope with all technical experts in the room and consisted of a risk review of doing the scope in the outage, or not. What worries me in the article by Becht is that they look at benefits vs costs, but very often in h
  4. Welcome back @Phil Kluetz the more people we have and the more topics / discussions are raised the more valuable the community becomes. It is what we make it!
  5. Just wanted to share a brand new video presentation that I just released: Increase Your Workforce by 33% Without Hiring Anyone How Maintenance Planning & Scheduling allows you get get more work done with less people, reduce costs and improve morale.
  6. This has been something I have experienced plenty of times, at different plants and in different parts of the world. In all cases the best approach I found was to really get Operations involved in the development of the Frozen Weekly Schedule and then have them present as part of a short, daily meeting where you review the work that was completed yesterday, is due to be completed today and what is scheduled tomorrow (we called it the YTT Meeting with YTT = Yesterday Today Tomorrow). And then at the end of each week report out what works was completed as per the Weekly Schedule and what did not
  7. Hi @Derek Brown when you install a new piece of equipment a large number of failure modes will indeed be random and not age related. The percentage of random failures depends on the equipment and also the operating conditions for example many corrosion mechanisms are age related (but not all!) which is why for example the submarine data quoted from the SUBMEPP study in 2001 shows a lot more age-related failures (pattern C) versus the original United Airlines (UAL) Study from 1968 (see https://www.roadtoreliability.com/reliability-centered-maintenance-principles/) And it also depends
  8. Sorry to hear that @Jim Vantyghem, hopefully things will start getting back on track in 4 weeks at least to the degree that you can get back to work. take care.
  9. Thanks for your insightful contributions @Raul Martins and @UptimeJim The immediate impact of this pandemic is terrible indeed and I'm afraid we're not out of the woods by a long shot. Many countries are still only at the early stages of this pandemic. As you both mentioned, Australia reacted fairly quick and with strong measures so early indications are that we have indeed flattened the curve - for now. What worries me is what an exit strategy looks like once the curve has been flattened. A vaccine is likely to be 12-18 months away (or more) and how do you re-open a country w
  10. Thanks for sharing @Doug Shortt and @Mike Walker. Indeed it seems that the CMRP is probably the most widely accepted and known maintenance & reliability accreditation. I am keen to support it, and often recommend people to get certified.
  11. Thanks for sharing your stories @Raul Martins, @Cornelius Mpesi and @Bukola. Looking forward to reading more of these! In the mean time here's how I ended up in maintenance & reliability, like most my path was not really a deliberate choice, but more the result of taking an opportunity that presented itself. I joined Shell in the Netherlands back in 1997 having completed a general degree combining engineering and management. Within a few months I was asked to start a development path towards an Instrument Engineer, which was interesting at first, but I did not want to become a t
  12. Welcome @Lorna great to have you with us. SAP is a beast that is for sure, hard to tame but very powerful. And welcome to you too @LaWayne Smith There are a few approaches I recommend to breaking that typical reactive cycle and which way you go depends on the state of your plant, but prioritisation of new work requests is key as well as trying to eliminate defects and those repetitive failures. Prioritisation can be a quick win and really give you more breathing space. But getting rid of a defect that has been causing a lot of breakdowns or downtime (i.e. a bad actor) can be a really
  13. Welcome @GThorpe, great to have you onboard. We'll soon be big enough to have a face-to-face community meet up here in Brisbane!
  14. Welcome @Wirza, @craig and @Andronica Kwapeng. In the case of Wirza and Craig apologies for the sluggish reply, but glad to have you all joined. looking forward to your contributions!
  15. Fantastic topic and post @Jim Vantyghem... I'm going to listen first
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and use of We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..