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Raul Martins

You are a new maintenance manager in a large, ageing industrial plant that is very much in a reactive maintenance mode. What would be your strategy to deal with situation?

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Raul- At that moment I m creating one BOM (of 10) for cars preventive maintenance, plan to finish 3.12.2019 with all reports. Just to ask, did you load 16000 assets with lines from some files? I don t have any data, so need manually making (typing). 🙂

PM_BOM2.jpg

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@Gordan, this project to us three years to be concluded. On its peak, up to 25 professionals, between technicians and engineers, were working full time on it. Basically, the technicians went to the industrial area and took pictures of every single asset and some basic information available on its ID plate. After that, they came back to the office and started to search for more detailed information on databooks and respective manufacturers of the equipments. All this information was filled in different spreadsheets. Once one plant was ready, I uploaded the information on SAP via Batch Input.

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@Raul Martins thank you, its good to know SAP performances. Have you using any methodology (flowchart, BPMN, ....) ? On this yours examples, can be possible found and reliability for any spare parts, of any business partners, and compare performances (prices/ working times...). Current project I m set up need work order (maintenance order) for cars (15000 km/ 30000 km/ 60000 km - that is 3 type of BOM) its ADempiere free ERP system

3 type of resource and 2 type of tools, every BOM have specific workflows (operations replacement motor oil: Auto mechanic should lift up the car an car workshop equipment, based on resource AUTO MECHANIC with setup time 5 min and duration time 5 min, next AM should remove stopper  and merge old oil 2/30 minutes ..... 25 activities) there is more then 10000 products (motor oil 10w 40 ....) input-ed from  purchase orders from supply chain management (SCM) located on warehouses. At the end I need sent link to my manager and he will input data in work order (maintenance order) so any costs for any cars will be sent to business partners (with one or more cars, for big organization its 20-30 cars) and all invoices and accounting and payment. At that moment I have not yet setup CRP diagrams for resource loading (there is 6 main and 3 external lines) . This is simple project I have  and not so complex. (http://wiki.adempiere.net/Sponsored_Development:_Libero_Manufacturing_Work_Shop)

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Lots of great information & advice!

Please note that the following information is comprised from my own opinions and personal experiences and your comments are welcome and appreciated.

Regarding the original question, I would consider the first and foremost endeavor to be getting to know one’s audience! Who are the key players in the process and how vested are they in creating and sustaining the necessary changes required.

From experience, I have worked for companies that have told me a story of  how maintenance, engineering, RCM practices etc., are paramount for their business success only to be find out that these practices were not followed let alone in place to begin with.

It is of my opinion that before a strategic plan is developed, implemented, monitored etc., it is important to perform the following.

  • Interviewing process - Ask lots of questions (Note: The better the quality of question the better the answer or information discovered).

  • Review present systems in place (CMMS, procurement, layered process audits etc.) for data collection practices of maintenance work management, PM, procurement and material management practices, ease of use, review collected data for useful content, asset risk analysis review (if there is one in place) etc.,

  • Review the company’s mission statement, vision, policies, procedures, protocols for Safety, Quality, Production processes and Maintenance, Engineering, Procurement, Material management activities etc.

  • Is there a support mechanism in place and how vested or reliable is this support towards assisting and sustaining the necessary changes required to improve all maintenance activities?

  • Are there available internal resources available to assist and/or will external resources be required?

  • Are there roles and responsibilities defined for maintenance activities?

  • Is there a maintenance budget in place and how is this budget determined?

  • Present issues, needs and wants of various departments and/or employees.

  • Are there any KPIs in place and if so how effective are they and how are they communicated?

    • Is there a mixture of leading versus lagging KPIs being used or are there now in place?

    • What communication style does one’s boss require… detailed information or summarized information?

  • What are the needs and wants of your boss, other department managers, executive management etc.?

  • What styles of communication exist -  meetings, monitors, bulletins / paperwork, radios, cell phones, emails, PA systems etc,?

  • Perform a pronoun test of the plant employees based on a “they” and “them” versus “we” and “us” –

    • Basically how is the maintenance team supported viewed by production/operations?

    • How is the plant management team view by floor employees?

  • And so on!!!!

In summary; - Again, this is based off of my own personal experiences and opinions.

The point of the investigational work is to determine what kind of strategic plan is required. This type of approach leads to;

  • Determining if the “Victory is worth the Win”.

  • Determining which Victory or Victories can be won versus those (even if they are obviously needed) that will take more time and effort or will not be achieved.

  • Developing a plan with an “End in Mind” approach.

  • Working smart versus working hard.

  • Determining whether your own value system is in alignment with the company’s values and direction.

Sincerely,

Jim Vantyghem

 

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Hi @Gordan,

I do not know exactly how ADempiere works, so comparing it to SAP is a little bit difficult for me. However, at that time we created all the BOM's as well as codes for each spare parts on SAP MM module. Once you have all materials registered on the MM module and the equipment information on the PM module, such as BOM, data sheets, maintenance plans and task lists, it is possible to generate many different KPI's, such as costs per equipment or functional location, spare parts lead time, MTBF or MTTR. 

SAP is a really powerful tool, as long as it is keep up to date, you can know pretty much everything that is happening or has happened at your site on your computer.

Regards,

Raul Martins

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5 hours ago, Jim Vantyghem said:

Lots of great information & advice!

Please note that the following information is comprised from my own opinions and personal experiences and your comments are welcome and appreciated.

Regarding the original question, I would consider the first and foremost endeavor to be getting to know one’s audience! Who are the key players in the process and how vested are they in creating and sustaining the necessary changes required.

From experience, I have worked for companies that have told me a story of  how maintenance, engineering, RCM practices etc., are paramount for their business success only to be find out that these practices were not followed let alone in place to begin with.

It is of my opinion that before a strategic plan is developed, implemented, monitored etc., it is important to perform the following.

  • Interviewing process - Ask lots of questions (Note: The better the quality of question the better the answer or information discovered).

  • Review present systems in place (CMMS, procurement, layered process audits etc.) for data collection practices of maintenance work management, PM, procurement and material management practices, ease of use, review collected data for useful content, asset risk analysis review (if there is one in place) etc.,

  • Review the company’s mission statement, vision, policies, procedures, protocols for Safety, Quality, Production processes and Maintenance, Engineering, Procurement, Material management activities etc.

  • Is there a support mechanism in place and how vested or reliable is this support towards assisting and sustaining the necessary changes required to improve all maintenance activities?

  • Are there available internal resources available to assist and/or will external resources be required?

  • Are there roles and responsibilities defined for maintenance activities?

  • Is there a maintenance budget in place and how is this budget determined?

  • Present issues, needs and wants of various departments and/or employees.

  • Are there any KPIs in place and if so how effective are they and how are they communicated?

    • Is there a mixture of leading versus lagging KPIs being used or are there now in place?

    • What communication style does one’s boss require… detailed information or summarized information?

  • What are the needs and wants of your boss, other department managers, executive management etc.?

  • What styles of communication exist -  meetings, monitors, bulletins / paperwork, radios, cell phones, emails, PA systems etc,?

  • Perform a pronoun test of the plant employees based on a “they” and “them” versus “we” and “us” –

    • Basically how is the maintenance team supported viewed by production/operations?

    • How is the plant management team view by floor employees?

  • And so on!!!!

In summary; - Again, this is based off of my own personal experiences and opinions.

The point of the investigational work is to determine what kind of strategic plan is required. This type of approach leads to;

  • Determining if the “Victory is worth the Win”.

  • Determining which Victory or Victories can be won versus those (even if they are obviously needed) that will take more time and effort or will not be achieved.

  • Developing a plan with an “End in Mind” approach.

  • Working smart versus working hard.

  • Determining whether your own value system is in alignment with the company’s values and direction.

Sincerely,

Jim Vantyghem

 

Jim,

you raised some execellent points. And it is also my experience that many executives talk about having many good maintenance practices in place, while reality may show a very different picture.

Some of your points are in line with what I would consider focusing on the basics, and many of them may well fit into my understanding of a proper Change Management process. I trully believe the latter is essential for introducing the improvements into the day-to-day maintenance practices. WIthout changing the way maintenance personnel do their job, the outcomes of any improvement projects will be hard to realize.

 

Best,

Andrej

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Hi @Jim Vantyghem,

Regarding your post being based on your opinion and background, that is exactly what we are looking for. We now have over 800 members with different experiences and perspectives, and reading what each one has to say based on that is what will make this community grow and learn more and more.

In terms of getting one's audience, if we think from a project perspective, one of the first steps when it comes to a project (as becoming a maintenance manager at a company and try to change it into a proactive mode can be considered a project) is the Stakeholders Management, which includes identifying your stakeholders, planning, managing and monitoring their engagement, so I do agree with you that this is a really important task before starting something. If all staff levels (from floor employees to the board of the company) are not comitted to change the current reality to a sustainable business, any effort will be way more challenging, as well the risk of failing will be considerably higher.

Additionally, this interviewing process, which I think could also be named as an internal audit is another important step, as with the results of this task, you will know exactly where you are on the roadmap, as well as your weaknessess and strenghts, allowing you to focus on what really matters in order to achieve your goals.

Regards,

Raul Martins

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17 hours ago, Andrej said:

Jim,

you raised some execellent points. And it is also my experience that many executives talk about having many good maintenance practices in place, while reality may show a very different picture.

Some of your points are in line with what I would consider focusing on the basics, and many of them may well fit into my understanding of a proper Change Management process. I trully believe the latter is essential for introducing the improvements into the day-to-day maintenance practices. WIthout changing the way maintenance personnel do their job, the outcomes of any improvement projects will be hard to realize.

 

Best,

Andrej

Andrej,

Thank you very much for your feedback. I am sure that we will have quite a few more engaging discussions as I too find that you have presented a host of great points/thoughts and strategic advice.

As I have spent a fair bit of time on the technical side of maintenance / engineering over the years, I have also been fascinated with the human side. Not only focusing on change management but also as a quest to understand why we do what we do and how to use this information to make positive change.

Best Regards,

Jim

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5 hours ago, Jim Vantyghem said:

Andrej,

Thank you very much for your feedback. I am sure that we will have quite a few more engaging discussions as I too find that you have presented a host of great points/thoughts and strategic advice.

As I have spent a fair bit of time on the technical side of maintenance / engineering over the years, I have also been fascinated with the human side. Not only focusing on change management but also as a quest to understand why we do what we do and how to use this information to make positive change.

Best Regards,

Jim

Jim,

thank you.

You put it very nicely - lots of maintenance / engineering professionals (including myself) have invested a lot of effort into technical scope of projects. For me, it took many years to recognise the technical aspects are not sufficient for success, when a change in a day-to-day practice is required. Consequently, I started searching for what had actualy been missing. It was definitely a human side of the change and, quite often, inadequete sponsorship. Then I started to look into different CM methodologies. Finally, Prosci's approach resonated very well with me - in their PCT Model they emphasise the importance of Leadership/Sponsorship, Project Management and Change Management for a project to meet its objectives and ROI. There's a good explanation at:  https://www.prosci.com/resources/articles/project-change-triangle-overview

And I absolutely agree with you on the need for focusing on understanding why we do what we do and how to use this information to make a positive change. This is but a prerequisite to address the Awareness and Desire, the first two phass of individual change within the ADKAR model: https://www.prosci.com/adkar/adkar-model.

I am not advocating the use of Prosci methodology as the only plausible one, I'd simply like to draw the attention of maintenance managers on CM when improving / optimizing maintenance processes and organisation, or introducing any other changes. Whatever the methodology they opt to use, it can significantly improve the chances of success.

Finally, as there are surely many other important aspects - several of them mentioned within this topic - I will personally never again leave CM out of the equation :).

Best regards,

Andrej

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