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Raul Martins

You work for a company that, although you have been trying to stop the fire fighting, you cannot as it doesn't have a defect elimination process. What would be your strategy deal with this issue?

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Hi all,

Having a well established defect elimination process in your company is key to avoid the reoccurrence of past failure events. By doing so, you will not only have a more reliable plant, but also achieve better results.

So, for this week's topic, I will create another hypothetical situation in which...

 

"... You work for a company that, although you have been trying to stop the fire fighting, you cannot as it does not have a defect elimination process. What would be your strategy to deal with this issue?"

 

However, it is important to mention that your company already has a Planning and Scheduling area, as well as PM programs.

Don't forget of telling us:

 - how you would create a solid Defect Elimination process; 

 - what techniques you would use 

 - the triggers; and 

 - how you would measure the results of such implementation!

 

Regards,

Raul Martins

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Raul,

I like your hypothetical unfortunately for me I have been living this world for more than a 1.5 yrs.

Imagine this real scenario.

1.  Plants that have no PM inspections or supporting schedules entered in a CMMS System that has been in place for 8 plus years.

2.  No repair history data of any use

... no failure modes or codes applied.

3.  Downtime repair history captured at rudimentary level

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Hi All,

 

I think that many companies having this kind of issue, but there is no word “late” for starting a reliable plant.

 

In my company, yes we have PM Program for all the assets (most of it executed internally by our people and some executed by OEM).

Regarding to the topic Defect elimination, normally we do Root Cause Analysis meeting that conducted weekly (consistently) attended by the production team, Engineering Team, Quality Team, Inventory Team, and Plant head. Here’s the general information from this activities:

1. Problem Description & impact

Take time to describe the problem to the meeting attendees, ensure the understanding are levels and share the impact of the issue (could be loss financial, loss machine availability , loss inventory, etc). The easiest way to describe the issue is by using flow process diagram

2. Brainstorming

Brainstorming is one of the effective method to gather information & perspective of each person. List down all the brainstorming issues and make a decision which of them are closest to the possible cause (can be more than 1 item)

3. Possible causes

The result of brainstorming issue compressed into 2-5 points. From here please do the 5 why analysis. Note: 5 why analysis is a tricky method, be wise on using this. The good 5 why analysis should be vice versa

4. Action Plan
From the possible causes, of course we will find what we want to do next. Create a table that contain *actions, PIC, support requires, due date*
 

After completing 4 steps above, we can make a KPI that monitored in certain period (daily, weekly, bi-weekly, etc). If the problem still occurs, normally we got back to step 1 and redo all the process with experience before.

 

Hope this can give insight to you

 

Cheers

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Raul,

I know that this does not answer the question directly but my approach seemingly revolves around that of a detective.

*Observe,

* Gather facts,

* interview the audience to understand the underlying thought process,

* Document the issues at hand.

* Formulate a plan.

* Educate all team members, make your intentions / plan known.

* Build rapport, trust and support. - Answer the what's in it for me question.

* Execute the plan.

* Monitor progress.

* Make necessary changes as time permits and experience dictates.

* Recognize and document every improvement / success along the way.

* Most important, insure all team members are made aware of the successes and thanked for their efforts. (A smile, a pat on the back and a good old fashion hand shake of appreciation produces unbelievable results).

Sincerely,

Jim

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Hi @Wirza,

Thank's for the reply! That is a solid approach. 

During these weekly meetings, you analyse only one failure event, or all event occurred on the current/previous week?

On my previous job, we did not have a weekly meeting to do RCA. Usually, when an event happened, we would schedule a specific meeting for that event. In terms of frequency, it used to depend on the due dates of the action plan, so we could have one or more on a single week. On top of that, we could have different RCA meetings for different failure events on a single week as well.

 

Regards,

Raul Martins

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Hi @Jim Vantyghem,

On 1/9/2020 at 2:25 PM, Jim Vantyghem said:

* Most important, insure all team members are made aware of the successes and thanked for their efforts. (A smile, a pat on the back and a good old fashion hand shake of appreciation produces unbelievable results).

Definitely! All endeavors should be followed by this step. This is how we build trust and engage people to be part of a culture!

In terms of techniques and triggers, would you have something to tell us? For example, different techniques which you use according to how critical the event is.

 

Regards,
Raul Martins

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