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Erik Hupje

What is your single biggest issue when it comes to Maintenance Planning & Scheduling?

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As you all know planning and scheduling is one of the cornerstones of an efficient and effective maintenance organisation, but many still struggle with this. So, I was wondering:

What is your single biggest issue when it comes to Maintenance Planning & Scheduling?

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Planning maintenance work can be a challenge because it normally consists of two different types of maintenance:

  • Unplanned or emergency maintenance to fix equipment breakdowns or other urgent work as it comes up
  • Planned or preventative maintenance to keep systems/equipment running in peak condition

How does one consolidate and manage these two types of jobs? How can one allocate maintenance technicians and work hours in the daily calendar to get both types of work accomplished? Many maintenance programs have grown organically over the years and end up mainly doing breakdown/ unplanned maintenance. Technicians work in fire fighting mode and preventative planned maintenance typically takes a hit. Not doing preventative maintenance on time (or not at all!) results in further unexpected equipment breakdowns and further emergency maintenance work.

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Hi @ALI, What you describe is a classic problem that people face before they have a robust and stable planning & scheduling process in place. One key step you should take is to get a prioritisation system in place for new work requests. 

All new work requests should be reviewed on a daily basis and checked against agreed quality standards i.e. clear, concise, complete etc. If they meet the quality criteria the new work requests should be prioritised (I personally recommend a risk matrix approach). 

If any work is so urgent that it must break into the weekly schedule then two things must happen before the work is allowed to progress (1) check if you can mitigate the consequences or reduce the likelihood so that you can defer the work (2) get manager’s approval to break into the weekly schedule.

What you want to avoid at all costs is getting your planner involved in all this, as your maintenance planner should be planning future work not today’s or this week’s emergencies.
 

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Our organization must go to ISO 9001:2015. Preventive action clause was removed. Our procedure include preventive action for electrical high voltage switchgear, high voltage equipment , etc. And National authority in electrical field have national procedure for electrical maintenance , with general definition and what means preventive action corective action .

So question what happend with preventive action ?

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What is your single biggest issue when it comes to Maintenance Planning & Scheduling?

Different industries different rules and people...
In marine industry every one try to work as team and not competitors. Not always it is going like should be...
Competitions and time rush is biggest issues.
Wrong spare stock management.
Team members  it self, some of them came to work for the money as reward for held position. And sadly there are who coming there just for reward... And in the last case is the worst scenario...
 
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On 6/19/2018 at 2:36 PM, robertosava said:

Mr. Robertosava question was :

What is your single biggest issue when it comes to Maintenance Planning & Scheduling?

 

 

On 6/19/2018 at 2:36 PM, robertosava said:

Our organization must go to ISO 9001:2015. Preventive action clause was removed. Our procedure include preventive action for electrical high voltage switchgear, high voltage equipment , etc. And National authority in electrical field have national procedure for electrical maintenance , with general definition and what means preventive action corective action .

So question what happend with preventive action ?

 

Edited by Evaldus

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preventive action generally result from suggestions from customers or participants in the process but preventive action is a proactive process to identify opportunities for improvement rather than a simple reaction to identified problems or complaints. Apart from the review of the operational procedures, the preventive action might involve analysis of data, including trend and risk analyses and proficiency-testing results..

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Hi @robertosava I would not worry about ISO-9001:2015 in this case.

ISO-9001 is all about quality management and the implementation of the PDCA cycle in your organisation. ISO-9001 is not a standard that prescribes a maintenance strategy for your electrical assets. So you can still have preventive maintenance, but what you would expect under ISO-9001 is that you analyse the performance of your preventive maintenance strategy, identify improvements, implement them and then monitor those for effectiveness. And the cycle repeats.

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Issues I have are (I guess there is always more than one!)

1. Maintenance is seen as an expense, as such not the right people are staffed or as what @Evaldus mentioned, people just want the post and pay, but can't execute the job

2. Management have clear way on how to derive a maintenance strategy (and worse, do not listen), resulting in a reactive mode or strategy that is not effective.

3. No formal maintenance management system (especially for an organization with more than one facility), which results in confusion for all involved from Technicians to Planners to Supervisors to Managers.

Just these three are enough to cause chaos and result in a reactive mode of maintenance

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I certainly recognize these issues @Jefferson Voo and I’m sure many others do too …

How do you think these issues are best tackled? What would you need to solve these issues?

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I intend to use the points you have put forth here (https://www.roadtoreliability.com/sell-planning-scheduling-productivity-improvement/) and to sell maintenance management system to my upper management. Management buy in would be the most difficult here in my opinion, and there after to assign the driver. Perhaps the other forumers have some other perspective I have missed? Would welcome input

Anyway, great articles you have @Erik Hupje!

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Work Load Balancing -

Many years ago, I had conducted a study whereby I collected several CMMS databases from various company locations. A macro was created and ran against each DB exporting PM scheduling information into an excel spreadsheet. The PM data collected consisted of the following.

·         PM task code.

·         PM scheduling code or rule …. Weekly, bi-weekly, monthly etc.

·         Estimated hours to complete the task

·         Group and sorted by each week of the year up to 52 weeks

·         For each week, the total number of PMs generated and total PM tasks hours were totaled for each week.

·         Total number of available maintenance labor hours vs required labor hours to perform the PM inspection represented in a %.

The results were interesting.

·         Every plant had a very high percentage of total weekly PM inspection hours that exceeded the total available maintenance resource hours. ( To clarify, out of 52 weeks, at least 40 plus weeks exceeded 100%

·         So, with what I had stated above, how does a company complete repairs, projects, non-repair type requests etc.? 

Summary.

·         I am curious to know if any of you have ever taken an in-depth look into available man-hours vs scheduled task hours and average non-scheduled / breakdown maintenance.

·         I have more information to add to the aforementioned in addition to more issues experienced with P&S.

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Hi @Jim Vantyghem, Just curious to know, does the data collected also contain actual hours/manhours required to conduct a task? Are also the estimated hours only wrench time?

Reason I ask (disclaimer, I have not seen a lot of CMMS databases), is that from the few that I observed, there are quite a number of facilities where the estimated manhours exceed the available manhours. However, the PM closing rate is still at 99-100% (CM closing rate is 100%, however I'm sure there are others that were not reported) and uptime is still as per KPI (depending on facility, ranging from 95-98%). So, what I deduce here (although I did not look into it seriously) is that

1. The estimated manhours required is grossly exaggerated (or it includes non wrench time e.g. permit application)

2. The field guys are taking a lot of shortcuts

Interested to know more of your thoughts and experience

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Hello Jefferson.

Thank you for the response! In my opinion, estimated hours are subject to someone's interpretation and thus called estimated hours. I agree with you that they can be grossly exaggerated and attention to this is normally overlooked or just accepted, but here are a few reasons why I believe it is important to pay more attention to this seemingly simple bit of information.

I have always used manufacturer's recommended PM inspection tasks and associated frequencies along with repair history, experiences and equipment age to create our own company PM program,  but I have never come across a manufacturer's recommended time frame to complete their list of inspections. One could perform a time study to establish a more realistic time frame required to complete each task and this may prove beneficial for the following reasons.

1. Improved effectiveness in P&S  - It stands to reason that if there is a more accurate time applied than one's planning and scheduling efforts are more stable and/or improved.

2. Guidelines for Veteran and Rookie Technicians; For veteran's - if audits are frequently performed to determine that all inspection tasks have been completed as designed it helps to insure that there is a less likely chance that, so called, pencil whipping is conducted. Also, it also provides a means to help train Rookie technicians. For Rookie technicians - this information can be used in performance reviews to insure that the company inspection reviews are met.

3. Estimated hours for Repair Tasks: I started my career as Class A Automotive Mechanic. During this time I had been paid via an employment process called "Piece work" which means that I was paid in accordance to what the car manufacturer had deemed was the appropriate time frame required to perform various tasks. I personally believe that if we focus on determining more accurate time frames to perform PM and Repair tasks, a so called "Company's Chilton's Piece Work Manual" of repair times can be established. In order to do this for repairs, one must apply very specific repair code structures which is another topic that can be discussed as a followup.

4. Production / Maintenance Communication Transparency: For any maintenance technician, lead hand, supervisor and/or manager experiencing a non-scheduled repair or breakdown, this question is almost always asked "How long is it going to take to repair the problem". Now this usually calls for an estimated time frame response but there is a good reason for this information to be asked and should be somewhat known.

If the maintenance time frame can be determined within a 10% margin, this information can be used by the production dept to better utilizes their production staff so as to work on those alternative tasks that matter the most thus being as efficient as possible in the wake of the repair.

Please note that the information above is of my own opinion based off of experience. If you have any questions please asked and I would like to share a topic that I would like to hear your opinions on " Repair history as related to RCM". I will post this tomorrow.

Thank you!

Jim

 

 

 

 

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Hi @Jim Vantyghem,

Thanks for the detailed response. I would also like to add one point which may not be applicable to other industries. I'm working on the offshore Operations & Maintenance industry as of now. The estimated manhours would be a good indication of how many maintenance personnel are required for the day to day maintenance offshore and as such, we can propose the optimal number of crew required to our clients. These manhours should be determined by 1. number of equipment on board and 2. maintenance strategy. Normally, CM with larger scopes are handled with the assistance of a "roving crew". However, as of now, the numbers of crew on board is determined by gut-feel and experience (although we may not be too far off from the optimal number), which may not be a great answer should the client probe for an explanation.

Repair history as related to RCM would be ideal, if the results are implemented. So far, it seems that some departments are just implementing RCM for the sake of implementing it, without measuring efficiency. "This has failed? Just do more surveillance!" But no changes are made to the maintenance. Looking forward to hearing your opinion

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