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Erik Hupje

What is your single biggest issue when it comes to Maintenance Planning & Scheduling?

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Step 1: download the Road to Reliability ebook (go to https://www.roadtoreliability.com/ and click "get started")

Step 2: improve efficiency with a planning & scheduling process, check out these articles

Step 3: determine your bad actors and resolve them through defect elimination and/or an improved PM program

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Convincing the client to take the downtime

Having someone coordinate the work also seems to be a big problem in the private sector. Just seems to be the wild west once the asset is locked out. One team doesn't know when the other was finished, go to lunch, the other is gone when they come back so they wait 2 more hours. Before you know it the whole day is gone and it could have been unlocked hours ago. 

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10 hours ago, Damian Schneider said:

 

In every aspect of maintenance, for me the biggest problem is dealing with purchases area.

Why is that @Damian Schneider? Can you give some examples?

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3 hours ago, Adam Coville said:

Just seems to be the wild west once the asset is locked out

@Adam Coville like the analogy - that's certainly not how it should be. Can you explain how it was managed in the Navy?

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On 8/1/2018 at 8:07 PM, Erik Hupje said:

@Adam Coville like the analogy - that's certainly not how it should be. Can you explain how it was managed in the Navy?

We have a Maintenance Control work center who's only job is to coordinate work flows to deliver assets for the flight schedule. This work center is manned by senior maintainers and maintenance officers. That is literally their whole job, they are responsible for saying the work has been done according to regulations and on time.  They centrally maintain maintenance records, they have set windows in which an inspection is due, and hold pre-PM (as well as daily or start of each shift) maintenance meetings with representatives from all work centers to get everyone on the same page.  

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No matter what size maintenance team you have, if it's anything more than 3-4 people things are probably going to go more smoothly if there's at least one senior maintainer coordinating the workflow this way. 

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@Adam Coville I've always seen the maintenance supervisor doing most of that role (especially in terms of monitoring quality and overseeing maintenance records) with the scheduler supporting from a coordination / workflow perspective. But in many organisations the maintenance supervisor ends up glued to a desk rather than supervising.

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10 hours ago, Erik Hupje said:

@Adam Coville I've always seen the maintenance supervisor doing most of that role (especially in terms of monitoring quality and overseeing maintenance records) with the scheduler supporting from a coordination / workflow perspective. But in many organisations the maintenance supervisor ends up glued to a desk rather than supervising.

Completely agree.

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For us the biggest issue is dealing with operation, whatever the criticality of the equipment, it is up to operation decide to give or not the equipment for maintenance activity.

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On 8/1/2018 at 7:36 AM, Erik Hupje said:

Why is that @Damian Schneider? Can you give some examples?

 

Because purchases normally doesn't have the same maintenance times, and don't understand that they are a service of maintenance, such as maintenance is a service of production. 

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On 8/24/2018 at 7:48 AM, Damian Schneider said:

Because purchases normally doesn't have the same maintenance times, and don't understand that they are a service of maintenance, such as maintenance is a service of production. 

@Damian Schneider one thing that has really worked well for me and my teams in the past was to get on top of our own maintenance planning & scheduling process, which created stability in our work environment and lead to a lot fewer requirements to rush materials and spares. When we got our work schedule stabilized the interface with procurement became a lot easier to manage.

You probably know Steven Covey's 7 Habits of Highly Productive People (I'm a fan) and one of the habits talks about the concept of Inside Out i.e. if you want someone to be better, be better first yourself. And I found this to really apply when dealing with procurement i.e. we want a better procurement team? well then we should become a better maintenance team first 🙂 

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Very interesting reading ! A lot of truths in here !

We have a very good maintenance manager with good planning skills !! Only problem is , it all ends with crisis management ??  Why ??  1 No spares available ! Why ?? One owner company , and HE has to sign orders ???  Sooooo , we wait !!!  Down time is huge  , yet production is expected ! Check mate !

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On 9/3/2018 at 3:09 PM, Johan Vosloo said:

Very interesting reading ! A lot of truths in here !

We have a very good maintenance manager with good planning skills !! Only problem is , it all ends with crisis management ??  Why ??  1 No spares available ! Why ?? One owner company , and HE has to sign orders ???  Sooooo , we wait !!!  Down time is huge  , yet production is expected ! Check mate !

That's an interesting challenge, often an individual company owner takes a much more emotional / subjective view of things ... but the upside is that you only really have to convince one person that changing the way of working could significantly increase his profitability!

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Some issues we face are:

-Planning and scheduling corrective maintenance that depends on material purchasing. Estimating wrench time in this case is not the issue, but how to estimate the total time from work identification to work completion if we don’t have full control (sometimes we don’t have control at all) of the suppliers deadline?

-Setting targets for maintenance KPIs such as:

·  Equipment availability (considering planned and unplanned downtime)

· Percentage of work completed as planned

·  Percentage of main hours used for different types of activities (I’ve seen for example 75-80% proactive work, 5-10 redesign or modification and 10-15% reactive work)

· Percentage of work requests remaining in “request”status

 I know it varies a lot from industries, processes, equipment…and also from the way the calculation is done. But is there any benchmark on these numbers so we can have an idea of how to control those indicators?

 

-Mindset is also a pain…training seems like an obvious solution. But not always we have time to prepare material and train dozens or even hundreds of people. What other approaches could we take?

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