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Erik Hupje

What is your single biggest issue when it comes to Maintenance Planning & Scheduling?

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The biggest challenge faced by me is getting the top management on board. Leadership at most of the companies that I have interacted still consider maintenance as a cost center and hence do not take implementation of maintenance planning and scheduling seriously. The end result is that the subordinates and other functions in the plant too start taking the subject lightly. So the true benefits of the MPS are not fully realized by the company 

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Lots of great points and questions there @Ana Carla  

Some of my thoughts: 

Material availability is often a problem in many plants and the first reaction from most maintenance teams is to blame the supply chain. But if the lead time of a part is 10 weeks there is little the supply chain can do about that. So as a maintenance team we need to make sure we understand those failure modes that can lead to long down times and that we have effective preventive maintenance in place for those failure modes. And if required the right spares.

For the percentage of work completed as planned, I'm not sure if you're referring to estimating accuracy i.e. did the work take as long as planned or did you do all the work you planned to do, which is often measured by a schedule compliance measurement. Schedule compliance should in my mind >80% but once you start getting >90% you need to ask yourself if you are putting enough work into the schedule. And for estimating accuracy an often quoted target is 75%.

Work requests remaining in request status - is this backlog that you need to complete? or are these work requests that are not worth doing and hence remaining at request status? Backlog is typically suggested to be about 6-8 weeks, but to be able to assess that you need to actually estimate your backlog...

Mindset is a big one and I think you're right that training is key here. But so is leadership and coaching. If you have hundreds of people involved in your process they all need to understand it otherwise it will never work. Now they don't all need to be experts in it, so you might get away training most of them with a single 1-hour overview and then have regular refreshers during say routine team / safety meetings. It's only your planners, scheduler, supervisors and managers that really need in-depth knowledge and skills in the planning & scheduling process.

 

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On 9/18/2018 at 7:58 AM, Erik Hupje said:

Lots of great points and questions there @Ana Carla  

Some of my thoughts: 

Material availability is often a problem in many plants and the first reaction from most maintenance teams is to blame the supply chain. But if the lead time of a part is 10 weeks there is little the supply chain can do about that. So as a maintenance team we need to make sure we understand those failure modes that can lead to long down times and that we have effective preventive maintenance in place for those failure modes. And if required the right spares.

For the percentage of work completed as planned, I'm not sure if you're referring to estimating accuracy i.e. did the work take as long as planned or did you do all the work you planned to do, which is often measured by a schedule compliance measurement. Schedule compliance should in my mind >80% but once you start getting >90% you need to ask yourself if you are putting enough work into the schedule. And for estimating accuracy an often quoted target is 75%.

Work requests remaining in request status - is this backlog that you need to complete? or are these work requests that are not worth doing and hence remaining at request status? Backlog is typically suggested to be about 6-8 weeks, but to be able to assess that you need to actually estimate your backlog...

Mindset is a big one and I think you're right that training is key here. But so is leadership and coaching. If you have hundreds of people involved in your process they all need to understand it otherwise it will never work. Now they don't all need to be experts in it, so you might get away training most of them with a single 1-hour overview and then have regular refreshers during say routine team / safety meetings. It's only your planners, scheduler, supervisors and managers that really need in-depth knowledge and skills in the planning & scheduling process.

 

Thank you @Erik Hupje!

About material availability, the thing is: working on failure modes is a long term measure. Until we get this work done, how can we predict work completion time? This is important, for example, for the energy team, that usually performs work for various areas within the facility and therefore needs to provide a deadline to the customer.

 

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Hi @Ana Carla if you need non-stock materials for a repair you can only give an accurate estimate of completion time once you know the lead time. This could be based on speaking to the vendor or based on the planner's experience...

I do however always suggest that people do the following:

(1) prioritise corrective maintenance based on risk using a simple risk assessment matrix and have standard target completion dates agreed based on the various priorities in that matrix

(2) measure how much of your corrective work gets done in line with those target dates

(3) where you miss important target dates due to not having materials consider stocking the material (or have a vendor stock it for you)

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On ‎7‎/‎25‎/‎2018 at 8:27 PM, Erik Hupje said:

The lack of spare parts is often raised as one of the biggest maintenance issues - and I have been there myself. But I do believe that before we tackle the availability of spare parts or our procurement processes we need to have our house in order in the maintenance department. That includes:

  • getting a robust prioritisation process in place for determining our real priorities and enabling us to mitigate risk where we can to create time for ourselves
  • being efficient and effective in completing work
  • removing repeat failures (defects!)
  • and stocking the right parts

With those things in place we often find that spare parts are still important but no longer the big concern they were when we operated in a reactive environment.

Hi guys, I am new in this forum and I have been reading all your wise comments, I have 45 years in the heavy industry starting from the Navy, Oil&Gas, Mining, Refinery, but most of my works for the last 15 years have been planning shutdowns which is a generalized maintenance, the other years I was and I consider my self still as a Mechanical and Maintenance Fitter. RM and CM is the crucial moment of maintenance planning where all the problems start, do you have the parts to be replaced? do you have the emergency team to do the job? how soon can be done? can be done in a shift the equipment is not operative? if is broke means you can do the job, so I believe that plan the plan is more effective and if you like Jim have the experience as a mechanic, then time estimation is more accurate than other guessing's, so what I do in this case and have been of good success for me and my bosses, First Identify the job via notifications, work orders, then approach the equipment, inspect, review, examine, tag the equipment with the notification, or w/o number, take a picture, the location where is the equipment, check what kind of tools the tech's will need, the kind of isolation required and by the time your Mech. Supervisor will start getting all the permits required and create a work pack with all the information including safety and if is possible getting a box and put all the parts that is needed in the working area, that will minimize time lost and effective results. PM most of the equipments have a PM manual, build the schedule and properly following up will also minimize loses, but if there is not manual talking with the operators, supervisors a PM can be created.

What I have encounter is most of my Project Managers does not understand our work, when I show them the dashboard indicators as an example, I notice they can even read what that's mean, but that is how happens, maintenance is not complicated, other peoples make them complicated with exotic jargons, a lot of graphics, requesting reports that not take to any where, when everything's is storage in the program and is accesible to them, I learn CMMS called MEX and I teach to Eng.'s in Saudi Arabia, also I lectured in Operational & Maintenance Best Practice. The best way to do our job is keep them simple, is just an equipment not a human been.

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Hi @JOHN V, you are spot on. There is way too much fancy jargon around. Ultimately it boils down to having the right people who take pride in their job and thererfore won't accept sub standard workmanship. 

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On 6/17/2018 at 9:48 AM, Erik Hupje said:

As you all know planning and scheduling is one of the cornerstones of an efficient and effective maintenance organisation, but many still struggle with this. So, I was wondering:

What is your single biggest issue when it comes to Maintenance Planning & Scheduling?

1. Spare parts and material of equipment that are not in the warehouse.

2. Sudden operations change.

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The challenge I have is the attendance of maintenance planning and scheduling meetings by other stakeholders especially Project execution department. The team will agree with maintenance plan & scheduling dates. All the present stakeholders will agree and sign off the maintenance plan. The maintenance work orders will be scheduled as per plan. Later on project execution will request shutdowns or outages without consulting the maintenance plan while they don’t normally attend the maintenance planning and scheduling sessions. Remember the projects are classified as a planned work. Their last minute shutdowns or outages request are always approved and this is affecting our maintenance plan and scheduling negatively.

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Gents.- many people confuse planning with the kind of activities they do, in response to Mr. Thabang concern, as my personal point of view is that Maintenance, shutdown and project planning which have a similar process, is not the same, starting that not all of them use the same software or program for the purpose you required, per example: MEX, SAP PM or EAM, MAXIMO and others are designed to be used for Maintenance planning, MICROSOFT PROJECT, PRIMAVERA, and others for Shutdowns and projects. 

Shutdowns, is an event that takes short times but with an specific time frame is a yes or yes works, which include sometime the whole plant, but maintenance planning is a programed actions stablished for periodic and sometime daily events, like PM's, RM, CM, etc. so in this cases but not all, you schedule the time when it is possible to do the job, but the contrary with shutdowns is all or nothing and to estimate cost that is adjustable. .

Now, shutdowns will not alter your schedules, contrary will alleviate works that you could not do it because of other factors, (equipments can't stop, you have alternatives like a bypass, etc) and for projects planning is a more relaxed work, because depends of availability of how the 11 or 13 stakeholders could prepare the whole project .😊

Edited by JOHN V
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What is your single biggest issue when it comes to Maintenance Planning & Scheduling?

when we start from corrective maintenance/unplaned maintenance to be going to Maintenance Planing & scheduling, they are some preparation must be made, some of them are :

1. SOP Maintenance Planing & Scheduling include PM Task Form, and others Maintenance checklist Forms

2. Maintenance Planing & Scheduling Strategy

3. Maintenance Organization Structure refer to the Strategy

4. Man power Preparation refer to the Organization structure

5. Socialization & Implementation of SOP Maintenance Planing & scheduling to Mechanics, planer, maintenance manager, warehouse staff, Purchasing staff, etc

6. etc

But the biggest single issue that will be appear and appear is Man power skill & Knowledge Problem and also the attitude, example;  Wrong Parts ordering, wrong analyze the Machine problems occurs, Re do Jobs, wrong input datas, etc . Re do jobs, wrong analyze, etc will be an additional cost.

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From my ample experience especially when I was faced with the task of determining failure rate of equipments and determining how reliable they were, a major problem I faced was Data acquisition... It ranged from knowing the time of failure of equipment, time to repair, and how is this data stored for retrieval and use.

The essence of this task was to improve maintenance scheduling and planning. 

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Well, I am back, and hope to be a more regular contributor.  Long story short, I don't' have a storeroom person, planner, or scheduler.  I have a weak CMMS (only because of lack of data entry).   Only have about 400 equipment numbers in the system where I probably have 600 pieces of equipment!  So I have a long way to go.  That being said, it also means I can lay solid ground work.

Question:  What naming convention have you all found the most useful?  The one here follows no formal process.  I do not have Highly Hazardous Chemicals, or anything that bad really.  We are cast film extrusion.  I want to make a standard naming convention.

 

Great Community, thanks all!

Phil

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