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Erik Hupje

What is your single biggest issue when it comes to Maintenance Planning & Scheduling?

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@Phil I can empathize with your lack of storeroom person, planner or scheduler. It is quite difficult to demonstrate to management the benefits of having these functions. I am unsure of the size of your organization and management will always try to cut cost by limiting manpower first, although (at least in my industry in my country) wages accounts for about 10% of the total OPEX. As such, cutting manpower (aka wages) is actually a drop in the bucket when it comes to cost savings. Ah well, gotta play with the hands we're dealt with eh?

For your question on naming convention, I find ISO 14224 quite useful. In any case, I use the naming convention as below

1. For inventory & description in CMMS, the naming convention is "Equipment type or part, function" (e.g. O-ring, chemical pump or Pump, firewater)

2. For CMMS (in which I am assuming you are referring to the taxonomy for asset hierarchy/functional location? If not, do correct me), I use this convention "System>Package>Asset Tagging/Component/maintainable item>Child tag (if applicable)". The example here will be "PWG>T1000A>SDV1001>LSO1001" where PWG stands for Power Generation, T1000A is Generator A, SDV1001 is a shutdown valve and LSO1001 is the limit switch open for the said SDV. Of course you can expand the convention to suit the complexity of your facility. For our current set up, we go up to 9 levels of Functional Location.

Do let me know if you need any clarification

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Eric,

The few simple reasons as most of the follows replied already which I always see in my company which is one of the WW biggest oilfield service companies are:

- Bad communications so operation team updates maintenance team late.

- Lack of resources making the unavailable asset goes to most important beeded job other than having enough assets to cover all requirements.

- Lack of leadership from maintenance supervisors so they don't plan their pending work properly.

- Equipment damages due to operation where replacement takes longer time to substitute damaged ones 

There are many other reasons but from my experience these are the most important ones.

Rgds,

A.Rahman

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Biggest issue I deal with is how to resolve the dilemma of planned PM's that require equipment shut downs vs production goals in a 3 shift 24/7 environment.  Preventive work needs to be done but production/senior managements never want to stop production. I've been trying to develop a rational (data driven) way to resolve this dilemma (for 20+ years).... I'm trying to resolve PM scheduling with condition monitoring data with ERP production schedules. Never ending saga... 

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17 hours ago, Frank said:

Preventive work needs to be done but production/senior managements never want to stop production.

That really is one of the most classic problems @Frank And unless you can show with numbers that a lack of PM leads to breakdowns and breakdowns result in longer downtimes it can be a very hard sell. Have you found that this differs from manager to manager?

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Management sometimes  are refusing to give us Plant for maintenance because they want their key performance index to look good. The other issue is the project management department they don’t normally attend outage meetings as a result they challenge our agreed maintenance plans and scheduling via executives and this sometimes forces us to reschedule our maintenance.

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8 hours ago, Erik Hupje said:

That really is one of the most classic problems @Frank And unless you can show with numbers that a lack of PM leads to breakdowns and breakdowns result in longer downtimes it can be a very hard sell. Have you found that this differs from manager to manager?

Doesn't seem to matter who the manager is. I'm researching ways to combine all of the condition monitoring & predictive data available with scheduled production quotas. There has to be some way to determine when to schedule PM downtime when it has the least economic impact on throughput. The better the condition/predictive data is the longer the span of time available to schedule PM's will be. Knowing production goals via ERP and the planned profit of finished product should provide 'windows' of opportunity to schedule PM's with the lowest impact on profitability. 

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22 minutes ago, Frank said:

There has to be some way to determine when to schedule PM downtime when it has the least economic impact on throughput.

I can only speak from my own experience in the upstream Oil & Gas and what we tend to do for managing production outages is the following:

(1) we maintain a long-term schedule and agree windows within the next 2-5 years during which we can shutdown the full plant to conduct maintenance or engineering works. Those windows are typically dictated by periods of lower customer offtakes (which are often seasonal). One thing this does drive is that all scope from different functions e.g. engineering, projects, maintenance all needs to be executed during the same outage. That is one way of reducing downtime.

(2) outages are planned a long time in advance, for a major 10 or 14-day shutdown we would aim to have a dedicated planning team in place 12-18 months in advance and go through a rigorous process to challenge the scopes and durations. A really important step is typically challenging the outage scope and then freezing it very early on so that there is enough time to do detailed planning & scheduling. late scope changes require senior approvals

This may not exactly work in your environment, but I have quite successfully applied the same principles to critical equipment outages (rather than full plant outages). And the rigor and discipline that comes with this approach really does reduce downtime (but can be hard to instill in an organisation!)

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5 hours ago, Thabang said:

The other issue is the project management department they don’t normally attend outage meetings as a result they challenge our agreed maintenance plans and scheduling via executives and this sometimes forces us to reschedule our maintenance.

Hi @Thabang one way you can help to avoid this is to work together with your production, engineering and project departments and maintain a joint, long term schedule of all plant and critical equipment outages. You can then get production to become the owner of that schedule and all functions that require outages have to add their scope into that schedule so that it can be aligned. This is a relatively easy and quick way to really reduce scheduled downtime in many assets!

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On 7/1/2018 at 11:04 PM, Jim Vantyghem said:

Work Load Balancing -

Many years ago, I had conducted a study whereby I collected several CMMS databases from various company locations. A macro was created and ran against each DB exporting PM scheduling information into an excel spreadsheet. The PM data collected consisted of the following.

·         PM task code.

·         PM scheduling code or rule …. Weekly, bi-weekly, monthly etc.

·         Estimated hours to complete the task

·         Group and sorted by each week of the year up to 52 weeks

·         For each week, the total number of PMs generated and total PM tasks hours were totaled for each week.

·         Total number of available maintenance labor hours vs required labor hours to perform the PM inspection represented in a %.

The results were interesting.

·         Every plant had a very high percentage of total weekly PM inspection hours that exceeded the total available maintenance resource hours. ( To clarify, out of 52 weeks, at least 40 plus weeks exceeded 100%

·         So, with what I had stated above, how does a company complete repairs, projects, non-repair type requests etc.? 

Summary.

·         I am curious to know if any of you have ever taken an in-depth look into available man-hours vs scheduled task hours and average non-scheduled / breakdown maintenance.

·         I have more information to add to the aforementioned in addition to more issues experienced with P&S.

Scheduled vs available man-hours (and planned parts ) is that very first thing I do with a client.  Imagine a PERFECT maintenance scenario ( I know this does not exist) where ALL of the required PM's for EVERY asset in your plant were defined in your CMMS. By defined I mean that the CMMS knows how many resource hours, crafts, parts, instructions, tools, schedules are in the system. The CMMS should also know all of the available hours for the entire maintenance staff.

In theory, if you did all of your PM's, nothing would breakdown and your maintenance department would only be doing preventive maintenance work. Ha! Ha!

My point is that I always run report that shows ALL of the labor hours and parts expense that the CMMS knows (by PM definitions) for any given budget period.  An annual report of the total resource hours needed to to PM's is easily compared to the available annual hours in the maintenance dept. This report also includes the parts I'll need to purchase and stock during the year and shows me the total cost of parts needed to do PM's for the year. This report is my '$0 based budget' used to show management the absolute MINIMUM $amount needed keep all of the machinery available when needed. Considering a world class maintenance operation's planned work is hopefully at 50-60% you have to at lease double the '$0 based' amount to get a ball part actual budget.

I can't remember the last plant I was in that had enough available maintenance department hours needed to do all of the PM's their CMMS system required. Having hard data from you CMMS system can be incredibly helpful in making a solid business case to get the budget you need.

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Frank,

Sorry for the tardy response as I have been off the site for a few months. Thank you very much for your response. As I had not provided all the points of what I had conducted in my research, what you have mentioned regarding reporting and so on had been a part of my efforts as well. Looking forward to reviewing more of your thoughts and experiences.

Have a great day!

Jim

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One of the greatest problem i have to face is the availability of the machines on the scheduled dates. Plants Or process equipment's are sometimes not available for the maintenance by the production teams this is the major issue where we have to reschedule the preventive Maintenance dates. This led us to handover the scheduling to the production department s where they will randomly select the dates for the preventive maintenance. 

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Hi @abhinav what you describe is a common problem and is one of the reasons why I always recommend that the schedule is agreed jointly between operations & maintenance, but ultimately owned by someone in your facility who has both operations and maintenance reporting to him/her e.g. a plant manager. This person should in his/her role review a range of performance indicators like schedule compliance, machine uptime but also preventive maintenance compliance and be accountable for a balance in performance. But yes, easier said than done sometimes.

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