Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Jim Vantyghem

What Types Of Information Do You Include In Your PM Task Lists / Work Instructions?

Recommended Posts

I am curious to know what types of information you include in your PM work instructions / Inspections?

1. Are your inspections detailed or general statements?  

2. Do you included lubrication instructions - location of lubrication points, type of lubrication, amount of lubrication, brand of lubrication etc?

3. Do you separate Inspections that require equipment downtime vs those that require visual, auditory and/or hands on with no downtime required?

4. Do your inspection sheets require the technicians to apply check marks to indicate the completion of inspections?

5. Does your PM inspection system include tasks related to  the replacement of parts based on manufacturer recommendations? If so, do you include work instructions to replace the parts?

6. Does your PM inspections included a parts list?

7. Does your PM inspection sheet or work order include a picture of the asset you are performing tasks against?

8. Do you use outside services to perform tasks?

9. Does your PM inspection include Lock Out / Tag Out procedures?

10. Do your PM inspections require a sign off by a supervisor etc?

11. Do you use a audit system to insure PM inspections are being performed as per the inspection task list?  If so, who does the audit and how often is this done?

12. Do your PM inspections include an estimated amount of time to complete the task? How much of your total weekly available resource time is spent on PM inspections ... % of time?

13. How often do you review your PM inspections and make revisions? What constitutes when a revision needs to be made? Who makes these decisions?

14. What percentage of your PM inspections are based on a fix scheduled verses other types of CBM techniques?

Would you be able to provide examples by uploading a pdf of one of your inspection sheets. Thank you in advance for your time and effort which is greatly appreciated.

 

Sincerely,

Jim Vantyghem

 

 

image.jpeg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Jim.

Let me give you some answers and oppinions to your questions.

ad 1: I always try to get as much informations as possible -the more detailed informations, the better for doing analyses.

ad 2: lubrication plan must have all the informations: period of lubricating, amount, lubricant.

Why: the amount is important - too much amount lubricant can be more harmfull than too little, also the time intervall of lubricating (it is better to lubricate oftener small amounts than in a longer period and a big amount). Not all lubricants are compatible - thats why  i suggest to use the same and give the info in the work order.

ad 3: that is not easy to answer. Maybe you should more specify this question.

ad 4: in my oppinion it is not necessary. I use this only for very important actions.

ad 5: No. Our teams have enough experience to decide about the parts. And yes, with the work order we give as an attachment drawings/instructions (not for easy tasks).

ad 6. Yes. In that way it is easier to prepair the action and you have controll, that you have everything with you when starting the task.

ad 7: Not yet, but i am thinking about to use this.

(the next answer i Will give later)

I hope some of my answer was at least a little helpful.

BR

Saša

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Mr. Jim Vantyghem.

(There was a problem posting so here is the whole post again but with more answers)

Let me give you some answers and oppinions to your questions.

ad 1: I always try to get as much informations as possible -the more detailed informations, the better for doing analyses.

ad 2: lubrication plan must have all the informations: period of lubricating, amount, lubricant.

Why: the amount is important - too much amount lubricant can be more harmfull than too little, also the time intervall of lubricating (it is better to lubricate oftener small amounts than in a longer period and a big amount). Not all lubricants are compatible - thats why  i suggest to use the same and give the info in the work order.

ad 3: that is not easy to answer. Maybe you should more specify this question.

ad 4: in my oppinion it is not necessary. I use this only for very important actions.

ad 5: No. Our teams have enough experience to decide about the parts. And yes, with the work order we give as an attachment drawings/instructions (not for easy tasks).

ad 6. Yes. In that way it is easier to prepair the action and you have controll, that you have everything with you when starting the task.

ad 7: Not yet, but i am thinking about to use this.

ad 8: Yes. Sometimes we need outsorcing for special tasks for which we are not speciallized, or we don't have special tools. For shut downs with lot of tasks in a short planned time we use outside services to get enough manpower.

ad 9: Yes. For this we use check marks.

ad 10: Not yet. Thinking about it - should be done by the teamleader or the foreman.

ad 11: Yes, for special tasks. Once per year.

ad 12: Yes, for sure. Because you have to plan it. Inspection is in my oppinion one of the most important tasks in predictive maintenance. So here we should not undervalue such tasks (as said - this is may oppinion and my experiences). At the  momet i am at about 8% spending time.

ad 13: I do revisions when something unexpected happens (unplanned shutdown/breaks because of a failure) despite of doing regular inspections. the decision is made by the maintenance management after analysing causes and effects.

ad 14: I don't understand this question realy - but inspections have to be exactly planned. The period depends on what you measure (runnig time, kilometers, rpm, produced peaces, working hours, and so on). That means a 100% planning.

 

I hope some of my answer was at least a little helpful and i hope my english is o.k. enough to be understood. We can discuss more. Maybe you can give me your experiences or oppionions on the points.

BR

Saša Ciglar

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sasa,

Sorry for the late response and thank you for your information as it is greatly appreciated. I will provide you with my opinions and experience to the questions. First, the reason I had asked the questions is for the following reasons.

I have spent 30 + years in the maintenance profession as a technician, maintenance manager, CMMS implementation consultant etc. I have created quite a few variations of PM inspections and also have had the opportunity to gathered quite a few samples. I am presently working for a company that has not done a very good job of establishing a good maintenance PM, repair and material management program. This said, I have been given complete control of the maintenance department to do as I wish to improve the operation of the plant. So, despite have quite a bit of experience implementing maintenance management programs globally I am going to take a different approach and ask people like yourself, Erik etc. for ideas and help.

Also, sometimes I work for my friend who has a Millwright and fabrication company on weekends to keep my skill sets, hands and mind busy. Recently I had to perform PM inspections in a large fortune 500 Automotive plant well known to the Canadian and USA . I was shocked to see how little information was present on the Inspection sheet and also how many mechanical issues we found during the PM inspection that had not been previously repaired and I suspect never reported. 

There were quite a few bearings with too much grease which had pushed past the seals and no indication of how many times or when the electrical motor bearings had been greased, nor the amount and type of grease used. In addition, there were not pictures to help us know where the equipment was located nor an illustration or diagram to help determine what the inspection descriptions where speaking of. 

 

With this said,, here are some answers to the questions you had asked me and please understand that these responses are only of my opinion and experience and I encourage you and/or anyone to challenge me on my thinking.

There was a problem posting so here is the whole post again but with more answers)

Let me give you some answers and oppinions to your questions.

ad 1: I always try to get as much informations as possible -the more detailed informations, the better for doing analyses.

 I agree with you that the more clear and detailed the instructions are the better the returned results. I would like to see a picture of the piece of equipment and or process line on the work order. In addition, if there are manufacturer related instructions that I would like to see these instructions as well. 

ad 2: lubrication plan must have all the informations: period of lubricating, amount, lubricant.

Why: the amount is important - too much amount lubricant can be more harmfull than too little, also the time intervall of lubricating (it is better to lubricate oftener small amounts than in a longer period and a big amount). Not all lubricants are compatible - thats why  i suggest to use the same and give the info in the work order.

Lubrication is a massively important and misunderstood topic. The right amount of oil / grease provided with the correct frequency is crucial. As you stated too much grease will cause a bearing to overheat and fail just as not enough lubrication will cause a failure as well. Manufacturer recommendations is a starting place and my experience has been that communicating what has or has not been lubricated is imperative. I have used service or PM service type cards that are attached the equipment and/or components. The technician is to sign and date when lubrication had been applied.

ad 3: that is not easy to answer. Maybe you should more specify this question.

Some PM inspections require the equipment to shut down/not running thus I classify these PM inspections as STATIC PM Inspections. Other PMs require the equipment running thus I classify these as PM Inspections as DYNAMIC PM Inspections. DYNAMIC TYPE PM inspections should always be completed as scheduled by STATIC TYPE PM inspections required equipment downtime and this may be more of a challenge.

In summary, classifying PM inspections as Dynamic verse Static may help create a more accurate result of PM completed rate.

ad 4: in my oppinion it is not necessary. I use this only for very important actions. 

I agree. I used to place my PM inspections on the equipment directly in a plastic covered sheet. I would not print the complete PM inspection instructions but I would print a custom report that would display approximately 10 PM work order numbers, the asset number and name, PM inspection task number and frequency. With this list the technician would go to the equipment and look up the appropriate PM inspection sheet. Once the technician has completed his or her inspection, they would apply their time spent doing the inspection against the work order in the CMMS System and the work order was than closed.

ad 5: No. Our teams have enough experience to decide about the parts. And yes, with the work order we give as an attachment drawings/instructions (not for easy tasks).

I believe that this information is valuable for the Maintenance planner / scheduler so that they may be able to assembly all the necessary PM parts required. In addition, as Erik had stated about the importance of the Planning and Scheduling. It will also help new maintenance employees become familiar with the parts. The parts can be scheduled with the PM inspection Work order generation. I use grey part totes to store the parts and place the associated PM work order on top of the parts box.

ad 6. Yes. In that way it is easier to prepair the action and you have controll, that you have everything with you when starting the task.

ad 7: Not yet, but i am thinking about to use this. 

I am going to do this with the new job that I have. This is just another tool that is very useful for existing maintenance mechanics and also for any new hired people. Just another example of good communication.

ad 8: Yes. Sometimes we need outsorcing for special tasks for which we are not speciallized, or we don't have special tools. For shut downs with lot of tasks in a short planned time we use outside services to get enough manpower.

ad 9: Yes. For this we use check marks.

With lock out tag out instructions, we place these instructions along with the PM inspections attached at the equipment and/or subcomponents.

ad 10: Not yet. Thinking about it - should be done by the teamleader or the foreman.

An audit system is never a bad thing! with ISO audits and compliance with policies/procedures, modifying the format of the PM work order and/or repair type work order should be easy enough to do whereby the bottom of the PM inspection work order would have room to provide a signature 

ad 11: Yes, for special tasks. Once per year.

ad 12: Yes, for sure. Because you have to plan it. Inspection is in my oppinion one of the most important tasks in predictive maintenance. So here we should not undervalue such tasks (as said - this is may oppinion and my experiences). At the  momet i am at about 8% spending time.

Again, one of the most important aspects for data collection and P&S activities. How can we determine how many maintenance resources are needed to perform all the necessary tasks if we do not determine the amount of PM inspection time. I have more to share on this topic and will do so in a different response.

ad 13: I do revisions when something unexpected happens (unplanned shutdown/breaks because of a failure) despite of doing regular inspections. the decision is made by the maintenance management after analysing causes and effects. 

Good point!

ad 14: I don't understand this question realy - but inspections have to be exactly planned. The period depends on what you measure (runnig time, kilometers, rpm, produced peaces, working hours, and so on). That means a 100% planning.

My question is related to how many PM inspections do you have that are scheduled with a reoccurring PM inspection frequency like weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, bi monthly etc. , Verses the number of inspections based on such methods as usage based PM inspection generation usually using a meter and either manually input of meter readings or by using a PLC. 

I like using this PM type generation system!

I hope some of my answer was at least a little helpful and i hope my english is o.k. enough to be understood. We can discuss more. Maybe you can give me your experiences or oppionions on the points. 

I hope that I have not bored you with my response and look forward to more conversations with you. Thank you for your patience and time

Sincerely,

Jim Vantyghem

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a little background, I manage the CMMS for my company which serves multiple facilities (offshore platforms, FPSO and the like)

1. Are your inspections detailed or general statements?  Currently, it is generic to the equipment type. However, a detailed procedure is available for the technicians that are developed by the team of that particular facility. However, there is a report template for each type of work order. This is to gather consistent info for each type of equipment

2. Do you included lubrication instructions - location of lubrication points, type of lubrication, amount of lubrication, brand of lubrication etc? This is made available by the particular facility maintenance team, but not in the CMMS. CMMS only calls for lubrication for example.

3. Do you separate Inspections that require equipment downtime vs those that require visual, auditory and/or hands on with no downtime required? Yes

4. Do your inspection sheets require the technicians to apply check marks to indicate the completion of inspections? Depending on equipment and type of inspection, but I find this a great practice.

5. Does your PM inspection system include tasks related to  the replacement of parts based on manufacturer recommendations? If so, do you include work instructions to replace the parts? No, when there is a need for replacement, then it is considered as CM. Instructions is normally as per O&M manual from vendor.

6. Does your PM inspections included a parts list? Separate sheet/procedure. Not in the CMMS

7. Does your PM inspection sheet or work order include a picture of the asset you are performing tasks against? No

8. Do you use outside services to perform tasks? Certain services where we require a vendor rep for warranty purposes. For example 8K hours of major rotating equipment. However, we keep costs as low as possible by using vendor supervisor and perform the job with our own crew

9. Does your PM inspection include Lock Out / Tag Out procedures? It calls for LOTO, but LOTO procedure is not included in the work order. It's a separate document. Some facilities call it Energy Isolation (which includes mechanical, piping)

10. Do your PM inspections require a sign off by a supervisor etc? Yes

11. Do you use a audit system to insure PM inspections are being performed as per the inspection task list?  If so, who does the audit and how often is this done? Only % of PM closed vs availability and/or uptime. This is done monthly. But the audit does not go into the detail as I suspect what you are asking

12. Do your PM inspections include an estimated amount of time to complete the task? How much of your total weekly available resource time is spent on PM inspections ... % of time? Yes, in manhours. Management is not concerned about the % of time as yet, so it is not tabled out

13. How often do you review your PM inspections and make revisions? What constitutes when a revision needs to be made? Who makes these decisions? Not a good practice by us, 1. only when something goes wrong (sometimes they do not even review it, only trying to "scapegoat" some one) 2. When a request for change has been made. Maintenance Manager is the focal person

14. What percentage of your PM inspections are based on a fix scheduled verses other types of CBM techniques? Even the CBM is on a fixed schedule. For example we do vibration analysis 6 monthly, and thermography 6 monthly. Only our engines are on running hours based. As such, I would estimate at least 90% of the PM are on a fixed schedule

I have attached a sample checksheet that we use

Gas_Detector_Checksheet_rev1.pdf

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi @Jim Vantyghem@Sasa Ciglar, @Jefferson Voo great discussion! 

I’ll share my thoughts below. Over the years I’ve worked in plants that have all had different approaches to these so I’ll answer them to what I see as ‘good practice’ – not necessarily ‘best practice’ because we can sometimes overwhelm ourselves by trying to get certain things to ‘best practice’ but in the process lose focus on other areas that could add more value.

 

1. Are your inspections detailed or general statements? 

I have seen many PM’s with general statements and often found them to add very little value. In my view PM’s should be precise and concise. They need to state the failure mode the task is supposed to mitigate, state the task and give sufficient information that a competent technician new to the facility can complete the task (and that means no referring to OEM manuals for settings!) And very important: include acceptable limits and what to do if those limits are exceeded!

 

2. Do you included lubrication instructions - location of lubrication points, type of lubrication, amount of lubrication, brand of lubrication etc?

Lubrication instructions must include exact type / brand of lubricant, frequency and amount. Although with UT grease guns the latter becomes more of a guide? Lubrication points should be clearly marked & colour coded (and be protected from contamination e.g. dust protection caps)

 

3. Do you separate Inspections that require equipment downtime vs those that require visual, auditory and/or hands on with no downtime required?

I think that is 100% essential. Once tasks are defined and the trade is defined the next step must be to determine whether they’re done online vs offline. Online tasks can be smoothed according to your resource capacity (or other constraints) but offline tasks where equipment is shutdown must be grouped together to minimise scheduled downtime.

 

4. Do your inspection sheets require the technicians to apply check marks to indicate the completion of inspections?

I typically propose this is only done for higher criticality / higher risk tasks

 

5. Does your PM inspection system include tasks related to  the replacement of parts based on manufacturer recommendations? If so, do you include work instructions to replace the parts?

I don’t like using OEM instructions as I often find them incorrect and not aligned with basic RCM principles (but not always as some manufacturers have great OEM manuals where real thought and attention has gone into the recommended maintenance regime).

If parts are to be replaced as part of the PM then I insist that the exact part is identified and attached to the PM in the CMMS in such a way that the part is actually called for from the warehouse or purchased.

 

6. Does your PM inspections included a parts list?

No, only for those parts that are part of the PM if additional parts need to be changed that is evaluated as part of the ‘emergent work’ discussion and often done on a separate work order at a later date.

 

7. Does your PM inspection sheet or work order include a picture of the asset you are performing tasks against?

I think this can be very helpful, but not always required. In my last role I developed a procedure on how to write maintenance instructions and in that I included a matrix differentiated tasks based on complexity / risk versus frequency of being done and then we identified three types of work instructions. Simple frequent tasks could be just a couple of lines of text. Less frequent and slightly more complex tasks would get more detail and maybe a diagram. High risk , highly complex and rarely done tasks would get a formally documented work instruction complete with pictures, diagrams, very detailed instructions and be subject to formal document / change control.

 

8. Do you use outside services to perform tasks?

Yes.

 

9. Does your PM inspection include Lock Out / Tag Out procedures?

No, standard LOTO is covered under HSE procedures and not in the maintenance instructions… BUT if the job has specific, non-routine risks that require specific safety precautions (PPE, rescue systems, isolation requirements) these must be included.

 

10. Do your PM inspections require a sign off by a supervisor etc?

Only safety critical work requires specific sign-off by the supervisor (in the CMMS) that he confirms and accepts the pass/fail evaluation of these tasks.

Supervisor does also review and close-out all work in the CMMS.

 

11. Do you use a audit system to insure PM inspections are being performed as per the inspection task list?  If so, who does the audit and how often is this done?

Your supervisor should check the quality of all work as part of his daily routine. But I have in the past insisted that engineers witness specific safety-critical work being executed as we hold our discipline engineers responsible for the integrity of safety-critical systems. That means they witness work to make sure critical maintenance is done, is done correctly, the maintenance tasks are correct and effective and they actually see the physical condition of the plant. Really helps to drive ownership!  

 

12. Do your PM inspections include an estimated amount of time to complete the task? How much of your total weekly available resource time is spent on PM inspections ... % of time?

Yes, every PM or CM task must have clear and accurate resource requirements! I don’t like allocating fixed percentages, instead I insist that the weekly schedule is loaded in a certain sequence i.e. safety critical PMs first, then safety critical CM’s, then all remaining PMS and then CMs by priority. Within weeks you may sometimes have to compromise on this because you have e.g. a specific contractor on site and need to get all their work done or you have a really large high-priority CM that pushes most of the PM work to next week. But having the sequence agreed and understood makes that discussion more structured.

 

13. How often do you review your PM inspections and make revisions? What constitutes when a revision needs to be made? Who makes these decisions?

Great question! I prefer an ongoing continuous improvement loop where the planner improves PMs based on feedback from technicians, but if those improvements change the essence of the task e.g. what is done, what parts are replaced or how often it’s done it must be agreed by whoever owns your PM strategy (e.g. reliability engineer)

 

14. What percentage of your PM inspections are based on a fix scheduled versus other types of CBM techniques?

That really should be based on your failure modes remember the distribution of failure patterns from RCM  but basically, some 70% to 90% of your tasks should be ‘condition based’, but remember they can be fixed frequency condition assessments which then trigger follow-on work as and when required.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi @Sasa Ciglar, currently we are using in-house developed CMMS using FileMaker Pro. It is quite simple and fit for purpose, so you can't expect full cycle functionality like SAP or Maximo system. What we have done is carve out the procurement and finance part of it and just concentrate on the inventory and work order sections.

@Erik Hupje Great points!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sasa,

Regarding CMMS systems .... In the past I had used Maximo Advantage 4.0 which was a stand alone product from PSDI the creators of MAXIMO Enterprise. At my present place of employment, the company is using a product called AMMS. I am still in the midst of understanding the functionalities of this software.

In my past, I was commissioned to source out a CMMS system and I had created a document of the functionalities that I expected from a CMMS system and I have attached this document for you to review.

In using this document I had reviewed over 20 + CMMS Software and outside of reviewing the MAXIMO and/or INDUS Enterprise software, I found 1 software CMMS system called MPulse 8.0 that I found had met almost all of my software needs.

I had the opportunity to purchase this software in the past and obtained great service. It truly is a great  product for the price. I am sure you already use a CMMS system but if you and/or anyone else is looking for a very affordable and easy to use software this is a great product to review.

Again, thank you for answering my initial questions about PMs and I look forward to discussing other topics with you and the others on this site. If you have any questions about the attached document please feel free to ask. CMMS Functionality Review Document.pdfCMMS Functionality Review Document.pdfCMMS Functionality Review Document.pdf

Sincerely,

Jim 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jefferson,

Regarding your CMMS use for the material management portion.

1. Do you allocate parts through the software to work orders?

2. Does your inventory system work off of Max/Min levels and if so does this system link itself to your Procurement system? If not, does your system create an order needs list of some sort and how do you process these orders?

3. Do you have a picture of the inventory item associated to the inventory item in the software?

4. Do you allocated or associate critical spare part lists to your Asset numbers in your CMMS?

5. What type of nomenclature / Taxonomy do you use to identify your inventory parts?

6. Do you maintenance/engineering departments have access to CMMS material management portion of the sofware? If so, what do they use this for outside of allocating parts?

Always curious to know how other companies use their software? 

Thank you,

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim,

Since we are an Operations & Maintenance Company that dabbles in a little software development, so our software are quite rudimentary

1. Yes, basically a work order number is required in order to "withdraw" an item with the exception of consumables

2. Min/Max level is a work in progress. Currently concentrating on major equipments. It does not link to procurement system (as of now), as the procurement system is a different system (and it costs quite a bit to integrate). As of now, matco generates the list of consumables (based on the min max) and supervisors generates their orders of parts as necessary. This is done outside of CMMS (plans to generate the order list within the system by Q1 2019)

3.WOrk in progress, so not all. It also shows graphically the location of the bin/rack where it is kept.

4. Yes, although quite weak here. Currently only associated in terms of packages and only critical equipment. Future plan is to QR code the major equipment, when a Tech scans the QR code, it will display a list of spares that are associated with it including what's in stock

5. The taxonomy is Package(or Brand), then item type, model number or serial number. ( i hope i understood this question correctly, if it is not the answer you are looking for, perhaps you can clarify?)

6. Yes. They use it to get info to order parts, but basically it is for allocating of parts

Cheers,
Jeff

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and use of We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..