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TPM RCM amd LSS blend


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Came ascross some info on the benefit of TPM. Six sigma appears to be the daddy of proceas improvement.

 

I found this an interesting read as presently we have no set standand to work to maybe a blend of TMP LSS and RCM is the optimal soloution to begin to implememt. A small team over one area to proof the system and then roll out over  each different area.

 

Thoughts, pitfalls, concerns, critisims are welcome. The html link is an intro to tpm the attatched paper is the meat on the bones.with tpm and lss.

 

 

http://plant-maintenance.com/articles/tpm_intro.shtml

9783319622736-c1.pdf

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Eric,

Well said. The foundation is the most important starting point! I have started a new position for a window manufacturer and within the first week it was so obvious that the plant has massive issues to address. After being here for 2 + months I have had a conversation with the plant manager and gave him the " no sugar coating" update of all the issues found and possible solutions thereof. Like the message you have brought forth " Back to basics".

Jim

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Hi @Hadwll, just saw your post and thought I share my experiences. Firstly how big is your organisation? I mean are you talking about hundreds of maintenance staff deployed over multiple sites? In case your organisation is smaller, say 50 staff, I wouldn't bother naming the thing. Instead I would focus on the basics and try to master them. This means have good planners who really know the plant and therefore do the right thing (as opposed to do the things right). After your planners have identified the true scope and required parts for the job you will need to schedule it most appropriately. This means to have a framework that allows you to rank your jobs by urgency and criticality. For this @Erik Hupje has mentioned a very useful tool he used to use. 

For many organisations these two basics are not well executed causing maintenance expenses to 'unexpectedly' increase. 

However, for large organisations (army, car manufacturing, aviation) the typical 80% rule might not be enough. In aviation for instance, where you expect maximum levels of utilisation and availability, you simply need to expand your measures beyond said two basics. Otherwise your maintenance becomes too expensive. This is why RCM got introduced and to this day only really works in that context. Why? Because they did do the basics right and also did the implementation to 101% (you know what I mean).

There is many organisations with bad experiences from RCM implementation. Mainly due to not being 'ready' in first place:) 

Now why am I saying all this you may wonder. Simple answer. TPM is very similar in that it does also require the organisation to be ready. Once successfully implemented you will have operators conducting "first line maintenance" which is exactly what is meant by involving staff or raise awareness. And yes I have seen this working in the army maintenance. We had proud tank operators who would make sure their tank stayed in good condition. 

So let me ask you again. How big is your organisation and are you ready?

Cheers,

Eric

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On 8/2/2018 at 2:03 PM, Eric Keetman said:

Hi @Hadwll, just saw your post and thought I share my experiences. Firstly how big is your organisation? I mean are you talking about hundreds of maintenance staff deployed over multiple sites? In case your organisation is smaller, say 50 staff, I wouldn't bother naming the thing. Instead I would focus on the basics and try to master them. This means have good planners who really know the plant and therefore do the right thing (as opposed to do the things right). After your planners have identified the true scope and required parts for the job you will need to schedule it most appropriately. This means to have a framework that allows you to rank your jobs by urgency and criticality. For this @Erik Hupje has mentioned a very useful tool he used to use. 

For many organisations these two basics are not well executed causing maintenance expenses to 'unexpectedly' increase. 

However, for large organisations (army, car manufacturing, aviation) the typical 80% rule might not be enough. In aviation for instance, where you expect maximum levels of utilisation and availability, you simply need to expand your measures beyond said two basics. Otherwise your maintenance becomes too expensive. This is why RCM got introduced and to this day only really works in that context. Why? Because they did do the basics right and also did the implementation to 101% (you know what I mean).

There is many organisations with bad experiences from RCM implementation. Mainly due to not being 'ready' in first place:) 

Now why am I saying all this you may wonder. Simple answer. TPM is very similar in that it does also require the organisation to be ready. Once successfully implemented you will have operators conducting "first line maintenance" which is exactly what is meant by involving staff or raise awareness. And yes I have seen this working in the army maintenance. We had proud tank operators who would make sure their tank stayed in good condition. 

So let me ask you again. How big is your organisation and are you ready?

Cheers,

Eric

Hi Eric,

 

Thanks for the detailed reply. You have put your point across very well. We are not ready, not by a long shot. I agree with your point on scheduling, that is going to be my focus. 

 

I think were we are at presently the foundations need to be in place?

Correct scheduling has been mentioned.

Correct leadership and management of resources.

5s.

What else are we talking about, what are the true basics?

 

 

 

 

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@Hadwll in my view the 'true basics' are the 4 elements outlined in the road to reliability framework (to download the ebook that explains this go to www.roadtoreliability.com and click 'get started'):

  • planning & scheduling
  • defect elimination
  • preventive maintenance
  • leadership & culture
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