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How do you prioritise your work requests?


Erik Hupje
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  • 1 month later...

Erik,

This a very good question and to be honest,. priorities are subject to change quite quickly and often. I believe a risk matrix coupled is a must. Also, I have always pondered what type of code system would help me out best for prioritizing. 

I discovered a great system in a book by Stephen R. Covey and course I had taken "FIrst things First".

A. Urgent & Important

B. Urgent but not Important

C. Important by not Urgent

D. Not important / Urgent

Sometimes we learn about how to better management our maintenance needs via resource not thought to be connected directly to maintenance.

Thanks,

Jim

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Sometimes have a critical surprises on field,

Where have no time to think about priority on work requests.  Where have to press the button STOP and no time for permits and etc..

And in some idea there is no place of research on why it happened and who to blame..

 

 

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We hold it very simple.

We have thre categories:

1. Not important (this means it has to be done in at least the next three months - no influence on production or on other assets or on quality,...).

2. Important (it has to be done at the next planned shutdown or until the next shutdown).

3.) High importance (it has to be done with highest priority - before it comes to an unplanned shutdown, or if the task is in correlation with safety for people or environment).

I also tried with a risk matrix, but it is not ready, yet and it seems not to be accepted (at the moment).

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Hi @Sasa Ciglar I am a big fan of the risk matrix, but do realise it takes more time to get embedded in the organisation. We use the risk matrix to help set deadlines for our corrective jobs and measure compliance against that. I also really like a risk matrix approach as it helps you to talk about mitigations i.e. temporary measures which can reduce the likelihood or consequence of the failure and therefore give you more time to organise a repair.

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Maybe i didn't work with the right matrixe lay-out. We got it from a consulting company - in my oppinion they learned at our department and they made

the first matrix. The problem of this matrix was, that we needed to fill in (in my oppinion) too much datas. This is one of the main reasons why it wasn't acceptet.

maybe you can upload just a screenshot of your matrix.

best regards,

Saša

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  • Founder

@Sasa Ciglar 

I've worked with a few matrices in different companies which I can't share, but here's a version that I just created:

image.thumb.png.a93df259dadfbad79c46fb847b95b05e.png

 

A matrix like this should be very easy to use. If you have a new work request you simply assess:

  1. what will happen if the new work request is allowed to progress to a failure e.g. you have noticed a bearing has high vibration. Then determine what happens if the bearings fails. Lets assume that it leads to a production loss of <$100k then the consequence category is financial  (F) and the severity is 3
  2. how likely is this to happen i.e. in what kind of time frame, lets assume the bearing is likely to fail within 2 weeks to 3 months if we don't do anything so the likelihood is C
  3. read the priority from the matrix (C3) = priority 3

We then typically set a target completion timeframe by priority (e.g. priority 3 is to be completed within 2 weeks) and then measure compliance against that to give us CM Compliance similar to PM Compliance.

There are a few more things to do when you use a RAM including giving people some clear guidelines on what the consequence categories mean (the ones here are pretty vague) and be clear on how to use mitigation. E.g. sometimes you can reduce the likelihood of the failure happening by taking a temporary action e.g. if we could reduce the load on the machine (or run the standby) we might be able to reduce likelihood from a "C" to a "B" which would then reduce the priority to a 4 and that would give us more time to resolve the issue (but only if the mitigation is robust).

Hope this helps?

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Yes, I can see what you would not want to use that for prioritising new work requests. I can't really read the column headings but it seems that there is a lot more data there than what you would typically use to prioritise work? e.g. costs, durations etc.

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  • 3 months later...

hi Erik,

i my organisation work requests prioritization is a daily job. our main tool is our risk assement matrix which couples the highest effect between  People, Asset, Environment and Reputation. The effect corresponds to a Severity, then you need to make some assumption base on your failure rate, internal operating rules to determine what could be the likelihood.

 

image.png.72b1da4f44d856d296a419cdf5ee9f6d.png

image.png.f0836d9bc3922240b01797f903f3e3ea.png

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